0
RESEARCH PAPERS

A Weight Function Technique for Estimating Stress Intensity Factors for Cracks in High Pressure Vessels

[+] Author and Article Information
J. L. Desjardins

University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

D. J. Burns

Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

J. C. Thompson

Civil Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 113(1), 10-21 (Feb 01, 1991) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2928720 History: Received September 21, 1988; Revised August 28, 1990; Online June 17, 2008

Abstract

This paper describes a computationally efficient weight function technique which can be used to estimate the opening-mode stress intensity factor around the perimeter of planar surface or embedded cracks. The accuracy of the weight function itself and of the numerical quadrature schemes adopted are verified for elliptical cracks with a wide range of aspect ratios. The technique is then applied to longitudinal-radial cracks at the inner surface, including crossbores, of thick-walled pressure vessels. The results obtained for a wide range of crack depths, aspect ratios and vessel diameter ratios agree well with the predictions obtained by others using finite element, boundary element and modified mapping collocation methods, as well as with previously unpublished experimental data. The paper also considers the applicability of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code procedures for estimating K 1 for these defects.

Copyright © 1991 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In