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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Strain Rate Effects on the Fatigue Crack Growth of SA508 Cl.3 Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel in High-Temperature Water Environment

[+] Author and Article Information
S. G. Lee, I. S. Kim

Department of Nuclear Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-I Kusong-dong Yusong-ku Taejon, Republic of Korea, 305-701

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 123(2), 173-178 (Oct 20, 2000) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1334378 History: Received June 01, 2000; Revised October 20, 2000
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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Figures

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Fatigue crack growth rate in high-temperature water environments
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Crack growth rate against strain rate
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Band formation in fracture surface
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Chemical analysis in a band on fracture surface
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Fracture surface at low stress intensity factor—(a) low magnification, (b) high magnification
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Fracture surface at low stress intensity factor; small cleavage formed around inclusion
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Brittle striated type in intermediate stress intensity factor appeared as fracture morphology
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Fracture morphology near inclusion at high stress intensity factor—(a) low magnification, (b) high magnification
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Fracture morphology away from inclusion at high stress intensity factor—(a) brittle cracks combined with microvoid, (b) steplike cracks with arrest marks

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