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TECHNICAL PAPERS

On Relevant Ramberg-Osgood Fit to Engineering Nonlinear Fracture Mechanics Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Yun-Jae Kim

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701, Korea

Nam-Su Huh, Young-Jin Kim

SAFE Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Kyonggi-do 440-746, Korea

Young-Hwan Choi

Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Yusung, Taejon, Korea

Jun-Seok Yang

Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Yusung, Taejon, Korea

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 126(3), 277-283 (Aug 18, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1760767 History: Received February 06, 2003; Revised July 18, 2003; Online August 18, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

Kumar, V., and German, M. D., 1988, “Elastic-Plastic Fracture Analysis of Through-Wall and Surface Flaws in Cylinders,” EPRI Report, NP-5596.
Kim,  Y. J., Huh,  N. S., Park,  Y. J., and Kim,  Y. J., 2002, “Elastic-Plastic J and COD Estimates for Axial Through-Wall Cracked Pipes,” Int. J. Pressure Vessels Piping, 79, pp. 451–464.
Rahman,  S., Brust,  F., Ghadiali,  N., and Wilkowski,  G., 1998, “Crack-Opening-Area Analyses for Circumferential Through-Wall Cracks in Pipes-Part I: Analytical Models,” Int. J. Pressure Vessels Piping, 75, pp. 357–373.
Rice,  J. R., 1968, “A Path Independent Integral and the Approximate Analysis of Strain Concentration by Notches and Cracks,” ASME J. Appl. Mech., 35, pp. 379–386.
Rahman,  S., Brust,  F., Ghadiali,  N., and Wilkowski,  G., 1998, “Crack-Opening-Area Analyses for Circumferential Through-Wall Cracks in Pipes-Part II: Model Validation,” Int. J. Pressure Vessels Piping, 75, pp. 375–396.
Kim,  Y. J., Huh,  N. S., and Kim,  Y. J., 2001, “Enhanced Reference Stress Based J and COD Estimation Method for LBB Analysis and Comparison With GE/EPRI Method,” Fatigue Fract. Eng. Mater. Struct., 24(4), pp. 243–254.
ABAQUS Version 5.8—User’s Manual, 1999, Hibbitt, Karlson & Sorensen, Inc., RI.
Norris, D. M., and Chexal, B., 1987, “PICEP: Pipe Crack Evaluation Program,” EPRI Report NP 3596-SR, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA.
Scott, P., Olson, R., Marschall, C., Rudland, D., Francini, R., Wolterman, R., Hopper, A., and Wilkowski, G., 1996, “Pipe System Experiments With Circumferential Cracks in Straight-Pipe Locations,” NUREG/CR-6389, USNRC.
Kim,  Y. J., Huh,  N. S., and Kim,  Y. J., 2001, “Effect of Lüders Strain on Engineering Crack Opening Displacement Estimations: Finite Element Study,” Fatigue Fract. Eng. Mater. Struct., 24(9), pp. 617–624.
Schwalbe, K. H., Zerbst, U., Kim, Y. J., Brocks, W., Cornec, A., Heerens, J., and Amstutz, H., 1998, “EFAM-ETM 97—the ETM Method for Assessing the Significance of Crack-Like Defects in Engineering Structures, Comprising the Versions ETM 97/1 and ETM 97/2,” GKSS Report GKSS 98/E/6, GKSS Forschungszentrun Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany.
Kirk,  M. T., and Dodds,  R. H., 1993, “J and CTOD Estimation Equations for Shallow Cracks in Single Edge Notch Bend Specimens,” J. Test. Eval., 21(4), pp. 228–238.
Kim, Y. J., 1998, “Note on Y/T vs. n for SINTAP Procedure: Continuous and Discontinuous Hardening,” document generated within Brite-Euram Project 1426—Structural Integrity Assessment Procedures for European Industry—SINTAP.
Bannister,  A. C., Ruiz Ocejo,  J., and Gutierrez-Solana,  F., 2000, “Implications of the Yield Stress/Tensile Stress Ratio to the SINTAP Failure Assessment Diagrams for Homogeneous Materials,” Eng. Fract. Mech., 67, pp. 547–562.
Webster,  S., and Bannister,  A., 2000, “Structural Integrity Assessment Procedure for Europe—of the SINTAP Program Overview,” Eng. Fract. Mech., 67, pp. 481–514.

Figures

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Schematic illustration of a circumferential through-wall cracked pipe under bending
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A three-dimensional FE mesh for the circumferentially through-wall cracked pipe
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True stress strain data with its R-O fits for two materials, the Type 316 stainless steel and the mild steel at room temperature: (a) and (b) are shown in entire strain range, whereas (c) and (d) are up to 5 percent strain
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Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using three different R-O fits. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
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True stress strain data with the R-O fits according to the proposed method for two materials, the Type 316 stainless steel and the mild steel at room temperature: (a) and (b) are shown in entire strain range, whereas (c) and (d) are up to 5 percent strain. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters are given in Table 1.
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Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using the proposed R-O fits. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
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Relations of σ0.2u and n for various hardening materials: (a)n from true stress-strain data and (b)n from engineering stress-strain data
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True stress-strain data for three materials, the Type 304 stainless steel at 50°C, the Type 316 stainless steel at 296°C and the carbon steel at room temperature
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Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using R-O fits, for the type 304 stainless steel at 50°C. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using R-O fits, for the type 316 stainless steel at 296°C. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using R-O fits, for the type 316 stainless steel at room temperature. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using R-O fits, for the carbon steel at room temperature. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of FE J values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using R-O fits, for the mild steel at room temperature. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.
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Comparison of FE COD values based on incremental plasticity using actual stress-strain data with those based on deformation plasticity using R-O fits, for the type 316 stainless steel at room temperature. Descriptions on the R-O fit and associated R-O parameters can be found in Table 1.

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