0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Stress Concentration Effects in Short Cylindrical Vessels With Holes Subjected to Tension: A Complete Account

[+] Author and Article Information
Nando Troyani

Centro de Métodos Numéricos en Ingeniería, Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas,  Universidad de Oriente, Venezuelantroyani@cantv.net

Nelson Jaimes, Gaetano Sterlacci

Centro de Métodos Numéricos en Ingeniería, Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas,  Universidad de Oriente, Venezuela

Carlos J. Gomes

Mechanical Engineering Department,  Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213cgomes@andrew.cmu.edu

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 127(2), 184-189 (Feb 24, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1904051 History: Received July 20, 2004; Revised February 24, 2005

Whenever regular geometric discontinuities are present the so called stress concentration factors concept is widely used in both analysis and design of loaded components especially when subjected to fatigue, frequently the working condition of vessels. However, recent observations suggest that the influence of member length on the magnitude of the stated factors was not considered in previous analyses. In this work, this observation was studied in the context of cylindrical vessels and it was found that in this case, as well, length could be a critical factor when computing stresses developed as a result of externally applied loads. Accordingly, the values of the finite element calculated theoretical stress concentration factors are computed, for the case of short circular cylinders with circular holes subjected to axial tension, in the context of elastic shell theory, and are presented in a fashion similar to existing published results. It is shown that significantly larger stress concentrations appear for shorter members. The transition length concept defining the threshold between long cylinders and short cylinders is discussed in the context of this study and reported as well.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Geometric features of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Cylinder cross section and location of the circular hole

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Typical FE mesh used in the study, showing the computational domain as one fourth of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Theoretical stress concentration factors for h∕R=0.002 as a function of β

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Theoretical stress concentration factors for h∕R=0.004 as a function of β

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Theoretical stress concentration factors for h∕R=0.01 as a function of β

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Theoretical stress concentration factors for h∕R=0.02 as a function of β

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Transition length for h∕R=0.002

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Transition length for h∕R=0.004

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Transition length for h∕R=0.01

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Transition length for h∕R=0.02

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In