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RESEARCH PAPERS

Introduction of the Element Interaction Technique for Welding Analysis and Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Ihab F. Fanous1

 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canadafanous@aucegypt.edu

Maher Y. Younan

Mechanical Engineering Department, The American University in Cairo, Egyptmyounan@aucegypt.edu

Abdalla S. Wifi

Mechanical Engineering Department, The American University in Cairo, Egyptaswifi@aucegypt.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 127(4), 487-494 (Jun 17, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2043200 History: Received March 14, 2005; Revised June 17, 2005

The residual stresses generated due to welding in pressure components may have several harmful effects, such as decrease in the resistance to cycling load and corrosive environments. The analysis of the welding process has been developed extensively in two and three dimensions. The element movement technique has been shown to be very effective in simulating the filler material deposition leading to a reduction in the analysis time. However, when attempted for wider fields of applications, it had some limitations, especially when moving the elements toward the base-plate. In this paper, the element interaction technique is introduced utilizing the concepts of both the element movement and element birth techniques. The new technique is verified versus the currently developed procedures. In this technique, the elements of the weld pool are held in place in contact with the elements of the base plate, and the interaction is made to be a function of time. This gave several flexibilities in modeling the welding process. Hence, the technique is then used to analyze simple fillet welding of a plate and circumferential butt welding of a pipe.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Diagram of the welding process

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Figure 2

(a) Meshing of the plate and the weld pool, and (b) schematic diagram of the contact surfaces

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Figure 3

Diagram of the variation of gap conductivity

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Figure 4

Major points, paths, and surfaces in Model 1

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Figure 5

Schematic diagram of the fillet-welding process

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Figure 6

Contact surfaces in Model 2

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Figure 7

Major points and paths of Model 2

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Figure 8

Schematic diagram of Model 3

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Figure 9

Start and end points of the welding path

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Figure 10

Temperature history at the top monitoring point using element movement and element interaction techniques

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Figure 11

Comparison between the heat flow in the (a) element movement technique and (b) element interaction technique

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Figure 12

Comparison of the longitudinal and transverse residual stress along the welding line for (a) boundary conditions set 1 and (b) boundary conditions set 2, and top of midsection for (c) boundary conditions set 1 and (d) boundary conditions set 2 between the element movement and element interaction techniques

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Figure 13

Residual stress distribution of Model 2 boundary condition set 1 (a) along the top of the welding line, (b) the bottom of the welding line, (c) top of the midsection, and (d) bottom of the midsection for different heat inputs

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Figure 14

Residual stress distribution of Model 2 boundary condition set 1 (a) along the top of the welding line, (b) the bottom of the welding line, (c) top of the midsection, and (d) bottom of the midsection for different welding speeds

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Figure 15

Residual stress distribution in Model 3 (a) along the welding line, (b) the section at 90deg, and (c) the section at 270deg for the fixed structural boundary condition. Residual stress distribution in Model 3 (d) along the welding line, (e) the section at 90deg, and (f) the section at 270deg for the coupled structural boundary condition

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