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RESEARCH PAPERS

Finite Element Investigation of Bauschinger Effect in High-Strength A723 Pressure Vessel Steel

[+] Author and Article Information
Edward Troiano

Army Research, Development and Engineering Center, Weapons Systems and Technology, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189etroiano@pica.army.mil

John H. Underwood

Army Research, Development and Engineering Center, Weapons Systems and Technology, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189junder@pica.army.mil

Anthony P. Parker

Royal Military College of Science, Cranfield University Swindon, SN6 8LA UKtony_parker@tesco.net

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 128(2), 185-189 (Jan 09, 2006) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2172616 History: Received November 14, 2005; Revised January 09, 2006

The Bauschinger effect has been evaluated in high-strength pressure vessels. A simple initial test suggested that a biaxial Bauschinger effect was present and that it was different from previously published uniaxial Bauschinger results. The difference was believed to be significant, so further investigation was undertaken. Several full-size A723 steel gun sections were heavily overstrained and subjected to slit tests in order to measure opening angles and displacements. These geometries were then modeled with finite element (FE) analysis using both ideal autofrettage stresses and Bauschinger modified stresses, which were based on previously published uniaxial Bauschinger test results. Because techniques available for predicting reverse yielding for overstrained pressure vessels were limited, a simple methodology for predicting the yield surface upon reverse yielding from a series of uniaxial Bauschinger test data was developed and is presented. This methodology, when used in the FE predictions, compares favorably with analytical predictions made previously. Comparisons of slit-opening results measured from pressure vessel sections with FE calculations using uniaxial Bauschinger data are made. The opening displacements comparison between the uniaxial predictions and those measured from the heavily overstrained sections with biaxial stresses are so subtle (<1mm) that the tests appear to be inconclusive.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Initial uniaxial and biaxial test comparison

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Figure 2

Mitigation of the Bauschinger effect via thermal processing

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Figure 3

Reverse yielding YIELD SURFACE for A723 steel

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Figure 4

Methodology for predicting the YIELD SURFACE

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Figure 5

Strain of reyielding–ϵR

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Figure 6

Mesh and associated boundary conditions, W=2.0

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Figure 7

Predicted hoop stress versus wall ratio (W=2.0) classic, Parker/Huang and finite element

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Figure 8

Predicted hoop stress versus wall ratio (W=2.25) classic, Parker/Huang and finite element

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Figure 9

Opening angle, α versus W

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Figure 10

Opening displacement, A versus W

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