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RESEARCH PAPERS

Stress Analysis of Autofrettaged Midwall Cooled Compound Gun Tubes

[+] Author and Article Information
Rolf R. de Swardt

 Denel (Pty) Ltd, P.O. Box 7710, Pretoria, 0001, South Africafeadoctor@yahoo.com

Tony D. Andrews

 QinetiQ, Cody Technology Park, Ively Road, Farnborough, Hampshire, GU14 0LX, United Kingtom

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 128(2), 201-207 (Jan 09, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2172968 History: Received December 23, 2005; Revised January 09, 2006

Analytical solutions for shrink-fit compound gun tubes were used to study the effects of the liner/sleeve interface diameter, the radial interference, and the effect of machining tolerances on tube strength. Finite element analyses were then done of a midwall cooled compound gun tube where a loose-fitting inner tube (liner) is permanently deformed by means of hydraulic pressure to lock it to the outer tube (sleeve). The interaction between the liner and sleeve was modeled with contact elements. The effect of machining subsequent to the hydraulic autofrettage was taken into account. Simulations were first done for smooth tubes with initial clearance of varying magnitude and, second, for the case where the liner has axial semi-circular cooling channels machined on its outer surface. Manufacturing tolerances were found to be much less critical for the hydraulic autofrettage than with the shrink-fit option. The interface diameter seems to be a relatively insensitive parameter. Relatively large initial clearance between inner and outer tubes can be tolerated. The hydraulic autofrettage option therefore seems better than the shrink-fit only option for compound gun tubes. It was demonstrated that the effect of the cooling channels on the stresses in the tube is significant and substantially weakens the inner tube. However, it is still possible to produce a workable design.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Influence of interference fit on von Mises stress in compound tube W=1.91 and B∕A=1.42 subjected to an internal pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 8

Step 2: Residual radial and hoop stress due to internal autofrettage pressure of 720MPa along lines OA, OB, and OC

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Figure 9

Step 4: Radial and hoop stress due to internal pressure of 520MPa along lines OA, OB, and OC

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Figure 10

Influence of autofrettage pressure on von Mises stress along line OB due to internal pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 11

Influence of radial gap on von Mises stress along line OB due to internal pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 12

Influence of interface diameter on von Mises stress along line OB due to internal pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 13

Influence of groove radius on von Mises stress along line OB due to internal pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 2

Influence of interface diameter on von Mises stress in compound tube with W=1.91 and I=0.3mm subjected to an internal pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 3

Residual hoop stress in compound cylinder with W=1.91 after removal of internal pressure of 850MPa (Step 2)

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Figure 4

Hoop stress in autofrettaged compound cylinder with W=1.91 and internal working pressure of 520MPa (Step 4)

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Figure 5

Hoop stress in autofrettaged compound cylinder with W=1.91 and internal working pressure of 520MPa

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Figure 6

Typical FE MESH with lines OA, OB, and OC as used in later figures

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Figure 7

Step 1: Radial and hoop stress due to internal autofrettage pressure of 720MPa along lines OA, OB, and OC

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