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RESEARCH PAPERS

Control of Static Shape, Dynamic Oscillation, and Thermally Induced Vibration of Nozzles

[+] Author and Article Information
D. W. Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Structronics Lab.,  University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0503

H. S. Tzou

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Structronics Lab.,  University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0503hstzou@engr.uky.edu

S. M. Arnold, H.-J. Lee

 NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 128(3), 357-363 (Aug 23, 2005) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2217968 History: Received December 02, 2003; Revised August 23, 2005

Static shape actuation and dynamic control of nozzles can improve their performance, accuracy, reliability, etc. A new curved laminated piezothermoelastic hexahedral finite element is formulated based on the layerwise constant shear angle theory and it is used for modeling and analysis of piezothermoelastic conical shell structures subjected to control voltages for static shape actuation and dynamically and thermally induced vibration controls. Free vibration characteristics of an elastic truncated conical shell nozzle with fixed-free boundary conditions are studied using the new finite element. Both frequencies and mode shapes are accurately computed and compared favorably with available experimental and other numerical data. This study is then extended to evaluate control effectiveness of the conical shell with laminated piezoelectric layers. Static shape control is achieved by an applied electric potential. Vibration sensing and control are carried out using the negative velocity control scheme. Control of thermal excitation is also investigated. Analysis data suggest that the dynamic behavior and control characteristics of conical shells are quite complicated due to the coupled membrane and bending effects participating in the responses. To improve control effectiveness, segmentation and/or shaping of sensor and actuator layers need to be further investigated.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A conical shell and its coordinate system

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Figure 2

A truncated cone—a nozzle model

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Figure 3

Mode shapes in the longitudinal direction. (Dashed and solid lines, respectively, represent the undeformed and deformed conical shells.)

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Figure 4

Mode shapes in the circumferential direction. (Dashed and solid lines, respectively, represent the undeformed and deformed conical shells.)

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Figure 5

The deformed cone subject to a −1.0 control voltage

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Figure 6

The deformed cone subject to a +1.0 control voltage

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Figure 7

Uncontrolled displacement response of point A

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Figure 8

Controlled displacement response of point A(Gain=10)

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Figure 9

Uncontrolled displacement response of point B

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Figure 10

Controlled displacement response of point B(Gain=10)

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Figure 11

Uncontrolled displacement response of point A

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Figure 12

Controlled displacement response of point A(Gain=50)

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Figure 13

Uncontrolled displacement response of point B

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Figure 14

Controlled displacement response of point B(Gain=50)

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