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RESEARCH PAPERS

Modeling of Granular Flow and Combined Heat Transfer in Hoppers by the Discrete Element Method (DEM)

[+] Author and Article Information
Harald Kruggel-Emden

Department of Energy Plant Technology, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germanykruggel-emden@leat.rub.de

Siegmar Wirtz

Department of Energy Plant Technology, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germanywirtz@leat.rub.de

Erdem Simsek

Department of Energy Plant Technology, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germanysimsek@leat.rub.de

Viktor Scherer

Department of Energy Plant Technology, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germanyscherer@leat.rub.de

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 128(3), 439-444 (Oct 27, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2218349 History: Received May 25, 2005; Revised October 27, 2005

The discrete element method can be used for modeling moving granular media in which heat and mass transport takes place. In this paper the concept of discrete element modeling with special emphasis on applicable force laws is introduced and the necessary equations for heat transport within particle assemblies are derived. Possible flow regimes in moving granular media are discussed. The developed discrete element model is applied to a new staged reforming process for biomass and waste utilization which employs a solid heat carrier. Results are presented for the flow regime and heat transport in substantial vessels of the process.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of force models

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Figure 2

Heat transport mechanism in a streamed packing

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Figure 4

Ceramic heat carrier

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Figure 5

Results for collisions in normal (left) and tangential direction (right)

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Figure 6

Vertical velocity distribution (m/s) of particles within a cross section of the heat exchanger

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Figure 7

Age profiles of particles (s) within a cross section for a less steep (left) and a steep vessel (right)

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Figure 8

Frequency distribution for different vessel geometries: (left) less steep and (right) steep configuration

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Figure 9

Particle temperatures (K) within a cross section for t=0s (left) and t=8s (right)

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