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RESEARCH PAPERS

A Stable Fluid-Structure-Interaction Algorithm: Application to Industrial Problems

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Abouri

 CD-adapco, Paris Office, 31 rue Delizy, 93698 Pantin Cedex, Francedriss.abouri@fr.cd-adapco.com, driss̱abouri@yahoo.fr

A. Parry

 Schlumberger Riboud Product Center, 1 rue Henri Becquerel, 92140 Clamart, Franceaparry@clamart.oilfield.slb.com

A. Hamdouni

 University of La Rochelle, LEPTAB, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle, Franceahamdoun@univ-lr.fr

E. Longatte

 Electricité de France, Research and Development Division, 6 Quai Watier, 78400 Chatou, Franceelisabeth.longatte@edf.fr

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 128(4), 516-524 (Oct 19, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2349560 History: Received March 15, 2005; Revised October 19, 2005

Fluid-structure interactions occur in a wide range of industrial applications, including vibration of pipe-work, flow meters, and positive displacement systems as well as many flow control devices. This paper outlines computational methods for calculating the dynamic interaction between moving parts and the flow in a flow-meter system. Coupling of phenomena is allowed without need for access to the source codes and is thus suitable for use with commercially available codes. Two methods are presented: one with an explicit integration of the equations of motion of the mechanism and the other, with implicit integration. Both methods rely on a Navier-Stokes equation solver for the fluid flow. The more computationally expensive, implicit method is recommended for mathematically stiff mechanisms such as piston movement. Industrial-application examples shown are for positive displacement machines, axial turbines, and steam-generator tube-bundle vibrations. The advances in mesh technology, including deforming meshes with nonconformal sliding interfaces, open up this new field of application of computational fluid dynamics and mechanical analysis in flow meter design.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Fluid and solid domains

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Figure 2

Representation of Eulerian, Lagrangian, and arbitrary reference domains

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Figure 3

Flow diagram showing stages of the fluid-structure interaction calculation

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Figure 4

Three-dimensional view of working chamber and oscillating piston

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Figure 5

Schematic of an oscillating piston meter

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Figure 6

Free-body diagram of an oscillating piston

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Figure 7

Evolution of mesh interface

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Figure 8

Piston movement cycle 1-2-3-4. Dark regions represent high-pressure inflow

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Figure 9

Comparison of predicted frequency against the measured frequency

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Figure 10

Comparison of predicted rotating piston velocity versus time using the coarse grid (13×90×8CV) and various time steps

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Figure 11

Comparison of predicted rotating piston velocity versus time using time step Δt=T∕82 and various grids

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Figure 12

Dynamic response of the spinner (fluid is water, flow velocity=1m∕s, initial spinner velocity=0rpm, β=60deg, r=8mm)

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Figure 13

Mesh displacement for concentric tubes

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Figure 14

Dimensionless added mass in terms of diameter ratio for concentric tubes for different Stokes numbers for viscous fluid (St=10,100,5000) and nonviscous fluid (St=∞). Comparison of numerical and available analytical solutions for St=5000(25)

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Figure 15

Dimensionless added damping in terms of diameter ratio for concentric tubes for different Stokes numbers for viscous fluid (St=10,100,5000). Comparison of numerical and available analytical solutions for St=5000(25)

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Figure 16

Computational domain for identification of fluid-structure parameters in a square tube bundle

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