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RESEARCH PAPERS

Destruction of Cryogenic Pressure Vessel and Piping by Shock Wave

[+] Author and Article Information
Toshiaki Watanabe

Department of Ocean Mechanical Engineering, National Fisheries University, 2-7-1 Nagata honmachi, Shimonoseki City, Yamaguchi 759-6595, Japanwatanabe@fish-u.ac.jp

Kazuyuki Hokamoto

Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japanhokamoto@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

Shigeru Itoh

Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japanitoh@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(1), 38-42 (Mar 30, 2006) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2388999 History: Received August 28, 2005; Revised March 30, 2006

In recent years, the usage of cryogenic fluids as coolant are gaining more attention due to their capability to fulfill the requirements of today’s advancing low temperature industrial applications. As a result, the use of a cryogenic pressure vessel and piping in LNG-tank, LN2, O2 tank for food processing applications and medical applications are becoming more important. In a cryogenic pressure vessel and piping, the reduction of thermal insulation by a small initial damage leads to an internal pressure rise and occurrence of flashing, which leads to a secondary crush of the vessel. In this study, a shock wave was applied to a pressure vessel and piping filled with cryogenic fluid and various observations were made. The internal pressure time history was measured and the safety of the cryogenic pressure vessel and piping was considered.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Outline of the experimental device

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Figure 2

Photographs of mild steel pipe before and after the application of shock wave at cryogenic temperature (87K). (a) Before; (b) after.

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Figure 3

Photographs of SUS 304 pipe before and after the application of shock wave at cryogenic temperature (87K). (a) Before; (b) after.

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Figure 4

Photograph of shocked SUS 304 at room temperature. (a) Top view; (b) side view.

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Figure 12

Experimental apparatus for the case of LN2 flashing

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Figure 13

Flashing aspect under pressure release. pi=546.6kPa, T1=93.3K, T2=91.3K, T3=90.5K, T4=89.9K, With backlight; Bright area: liquid (unboiling) part; dark area: boiling part.

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Figure 14

Pressure-time history under depressurization in the pressure vessel

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Figure 5

Photograph of shocked SUS 304 at cryogenic temperature (87K). (a) Top view; (b) side view.

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Figure 6

Relationship between Vickers hardness and distance from the shocked surface in the case of SUS 304. (a) Position 1; (b) position 2; (c) position 3.

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Figure 7

Schematic arrangement of experimental set up for the case of LN2 tank

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Figure 8

Photograph of LN2 tank before shocked

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Figure 9

Photograph of LN2 tank after shocked

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Figure 10

Photograph of LN2 tank after shocked (enlarged)

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Figure 11

Photograph of LN2 tank after shocked (side view)

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