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RESEARCH PAPERS

Mode-I Stress-Intensity Factors for a Cracked Slab Under an Arbitrary Thermal Shock

[+] Author and Article Information
A. E. Segall

Engineering Science and Mechanics,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802asegall@psu.edu

J. Meeker

Engineering Science and Mechanics,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(2), 306-312 (Jun 01, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2716435 History: Received January 23, 2006; Revised June 01, 2006

A stress intensity factor solution for a cracked slab subjected to an arbitrary thermal shock on one surface has been derived. As a first step, the transient temperature distribution was calculated for an arbitrary surface loading through the use of Duhamul’s integral relationship and the unit response for a slab that is insulated on the other face. The arbitrary nature of the transient surface loading was accommodated by a versatile polynomial containing both integral- and half-order terms. Once the resulting transient stress states were determined via elasticity theory, the resulting stress intensification for an arbitrary crack was approximated using a weight-function approach. The procedure was checked with known stress intensity solutions for an edge-cracked plate subjected to a linear down shock followed by a constant temperature soak. Excellent agreement was observed for this test case for a variety of crack lengths.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Slab geometry including crack-geometry and applied boundary conditions on both surfaces

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Figure 2

Transient thermal response at various slab depths for an asymptotic thermal loading on the surface

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Figure 3

Down-shock thermal scenario and approximating polynomial

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Figure 4

Comparisons of transient thermal response calculated for various depths as a function of time for the down-shock portion

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Figure 5

Comparisons of transient, thermal stresses calculated for various depths as a function of time for the down shock

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Figure 6

Comparison of normalized, transient stress-intensity factors predictions for various crack sizes under the down shock

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