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RESEARCH PAPERS

On the Mechanics of Residual Stresses in Girth Welds

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Dong

Center for Welded Structures Research, BATTELLE, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201dongp@battelle.org

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(3), 345-354 (Nov 23, 2006) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2748817 History: Received August 13, 2005; Revised November 23, 2006

In this paper, some of the important controlling parameters governing weld residual stress distributions are presented for girth welds in pipe and vessel components, based on a large number of residual stress solutions available to date. The focus is placed upon the understanding of some of the overall characteristics in through-wall residual stress distributions and their generalization for vessel and pipe girth welds. In doing so, a unified framework for prescribing residual stress distributions is outlined for fitness-for-service assessment of vessel and pipe girth welds. The effects of various joint geometry and welding procedure parameters on through thickness residual stress distributions are also demonstrated in the order of their relative importance.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Comparison of axial residual stress profiles for a pipe girth weld (t=19.6mm, R∕t=10.5, Q=1.4kJ∕mm) from current codes and recommended assessment procedures (3)

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Figure 13

Weld yield strength mismatch effects on axial residual stress distributions (16) (r∕t∼100, t=38mm, SS)

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Figure 8

Parametric description of the transition from “self-equilibrating” dominated to self-equilibrating dominated residual stress distributions

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Figure 7

Self-equilibrating-type axial residual stress distribution validated by experimental measurements

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Figure 6

Residual stress distributions from a carbon steel pipe girth weld

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Figure 5

Bending type axial residual stress distributions validated by surface-hole drilling measurements (7,12)

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Figure 4

Hoop residual stress distributions in multipass weld in girth welds corresponding to the two types of axial residual stress distributions in Fig. 3: (a) hoop residual stress distributions corresponding to bending type of axial residual stresses; (b) hoop residual stress distributions corresponding self-equilibrating-type of axial residual stresses

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Figure 3

Two typical types of axial residual stress distributions in girth welds (4): (a) “bending” type; (b) “self-equilibrating” type

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Figure 2

Girth welds in pipes, vessel, and storage tanks and typical defects of concerns

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Figure 12

Weld sequence effects on through-thickness residual stress distributions in a thick pipe (r∕t=56) reported by Mochizuki (9)

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Figure 11

Thickness effects on residual stress distributions at weld toe under same heat input and r∕t ratio: (a) axial residual stress distributions showing transition from bending dominated to self-equilibrating dominated type; (b) hoop residual stress distributions (Courtesy of ongoing PVRC Joint Industry Project (13))

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Figure 10

Thickness effects on residual stress distributions under same heat input and r∕t ratio (10): (a) axial residual stress distributions; (b) hoop residual stress distributions (Courtesy of ongoing PVRC Joint Industry Project (13))

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Figure 9

Through-wall residual stress distributions in a large diameter carbon steel vessel (t=13mm, r∕t∼1000): (a) axial residual stress, s11; (b) hoop residual stress, s33

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