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RESEARCH PAPERS

Limit Load Analysis of Cracked Components Using the Reference Volume Method

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Adibi-Asl1

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canadaradibi@engr.mun.ca

R. Seshadri

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(3), 391-399 (Jul 03, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2749288 History: Received October 21, 2005; Revised July 03, 2006

Cracks and flaws occur in mechanical components and structures, and can lead to catastrophic failures. Therefore, integrity assessment of components with defects is carried out. This paper describes the Elastic Modulus Adjustment Procedures (EMAP) employed herein to determine the limit load of components with cracks or crack-like flaw. On the basis of linear elastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA), by specifying spatial variations in the elastic modulus, numerous sets of statically admissible and kinematically admissible distributions can be generated, to obtain lower and upper bounds limit loads. Due to the expected local plastic collapse, the reference volume concept is applied to identify the kinematically active and dead zones in the component. The Reference Volume Method is shown to yield a more accurate prediction of local limit loads. The limit load values are then compared with results obtained from inelastic FEA. The procedures are applied to a practical component with crack in order to verify their effectiveness in analyzing crack geometries. The analysis is then directed to geometries containing multiple cracks and three-dimensional defect in pressurized components.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 10

Variation of m20 with elastic iterations for compact tension (CT) specimen: Reference Volume Approach (procedure 1)

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Figure 12

Variation of limit load multipliers for plate with multiple cracks: Direct EMAP

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Figure 13

Variation of G20 for the plate with multiple cracks: Direct EMAP

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Figure 14

Variation of m20 with elastic iterations for plate with multiple cracks: Reference Volume Approach (procedure 1)

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Figure 15

Variation of m20 versus V¯η for the plate with multiple cracks: Reference Volume Approach (procedure 2)

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Figure 16

Typical finite element mesh: (a) one quarter model; (b) local crack detail

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Figure 17

Variation of limit load multipliers for axial semielliptical surface crack: Direct EMAP

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Figure 18

Variation of G20 for an axial semielliptical surface crack: Direct EMAP

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Figure 19

Variation of m20 with elastic iterations for an axial semielliptical surface crack: Reference Volume Approach (procedure 1)

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Figure 20

Variation of m20 versus V¯η for axial semielliptical surface crack: Reference Volume Approach (procedure 2)

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Figure 2

Compact tension (CT) specimen: reference stress and uniaxial stress-strain model

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Figure 1

Relaxation locus for pressure components with a crack

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Figure 11

Variation of m20 versus V¯η for compact tension (CT) specimen: Reference Volume Approach (procedure 2)

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Figure 3

A body with elastic-perfectly plastic material

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Figure 4

Total and reference volume

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Figure 5

Variation of m20 with elastic iterations

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Figure 6

Variation of m20 with volume ratio

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Figure 7

Geometry and dimensions for (a) compact tension specimen; (b) plate with multiple cracks; (c) axial semielliptical (inner) surface crack (3D)

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Figure 8

Variation of limit load multipliers for compact tension (CT) specimen; direct EMAP

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Figure 9

Variation of G20 for compact tension (CT) specimen; direct EMAP

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