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RESEARCH PAPERS

Quantitative Prediction of EAC Crack Growth Rate of Sensitized Type 304 Stainless Steel in Boiling Water Reactor Environments Based on EPFEM

[+] Author and Article Information
He Xue

Fracture and Reliability Research Institute,  Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japanxue_he@hotmail.com

Tetsuo Shoji

Fracture and Reliability Research Institute,  Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japan

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(3), 460-467 (Aug 28, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2748827 History: Received November 20, 2005; Revised August 28, 2006

The quantitative prediction of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is essential in order to predict service life and also the structural integrity and safety assessment of light water reactors. During the last 3 decades many of the research results obtained on the quantitative prediction of the EAC crack growth rate have been based on linear fracture mechanics. In order to investigate EAC behavior in the high strain zone of important structures in light water reactors, the approach taken in this paper is one in which quantitative calculations of the EAC crack growth rate, incorporating the SCC deformation /oxidation model and the elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM), are carried out. This approach can be used for the quantitative prediction of EAC crack growth rate in both the low and high strain zones of key structures in light water reactors. The crack growth behavior of sensitized type 304 stainless steel with a 1T-CT specimen in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments is analyzed based on this approach. The effect of several environmental, material, and mechanical parameters on the EAC crack growth rate of nickel based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments is also discussed.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic illustration of the slip-dissolution model for SCC propagation (i0 is the bare surface oxidation current density; t0 is the time for the onset of current decay; and tf is the period for crack tip film degradation)

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Figure 9

Relation of Δa and Δεp

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Figure 10

Variation of plastic strain with crack growth in front of the crack tip at various stress intensity factors

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Figure 11

Effect of characteristic distance r0 on crack growth rate

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Figure 12

Stress triaxiality in front of the crack tip for various stress intensity factors: (a) stress triaxiality in front of crack tip; and (b) position of maximal stress triaxiality

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Figure 13

Effect of the exponent of the current decay curve on crack growth rate

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Figure 14

Effect of i0 on crack growth rate

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Figure 15

Effect of duration of current density on crack growth rate

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Figure 16

Effect of fracture strain of oxide on crack growth rate

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Figure 8

Plastic strain in front of a steadily growing crack tip (K=30MPam1∕2)

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Figure 7

Plastic strain gradient in front of the crack tip for various stress intensities

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Figure 6

Tensile plastic strain around the crack tip (KI=30MPam1∕2)

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Figure 5

Tensile plastic strain in front of the crack tip (KI=30MPam1∕2)

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Figure 4

Tensile stress distribution around the crack tip (KI=30MPam1∕2)

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Figure 3

Tensile stress in front of the crack tip (KI=30MPam1∕2)

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Figure 2

Finite element mesh of 1T-CT specimen: (a) half of the specimen; and (b) detail around crack tip

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