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RESEARCH PAPERS

Finite Element Prediction of Residual Stress Distributions in a Multipass Welded Piping Branch Junction

[+] Author and Article Information
Wei Jiang

School of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Wolverhampton, Telford Campus, Telford TF2 9NT, United Kingdomw.jiang@wlv.ac.ukand School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, Chinaw.jiang@wlv.ac.uk

Kadda Yahiaoui

School of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Wolverhampton, Telford Campus, Telford TF2 9NT, United Kingdomk.yahiaoui@wlv.ac.uk

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(4), 601-608 (Sep 13, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2767343 History: Received March 24, 2006; Revised September 13, 2006

Piping branch junctions and nozzle attachments to main pressure vessels are common engineering components used in the power, oil and gas, and shipbuilding industries amongst others. These components are usually fabricated by multipass welding. The latter process is known to induce residual stresses at the fabrication stage, which can have severe adverse effects on the in-service behavior of such critical components. It is thus desirable if the distributions of residual stresses can be predicted well in advance of welding execution. This paper presents a comprehensive study of three dimensional residual stress distributions in a stainless steel tee branch junction during a multipass welding process. A full three dimensional thermomechanical finite element model has been developed for this purpose. A newly developed meshing technique has been used to model the complex intersection areas of the welded junction with all hexahedral elements. Element removal/reactivate technique has been employed to simulate the deposition of filler material. Material, geometry, and boundary nonlinearities associated with welding were all taken into account. The analysis results are presented in the form of stress distributions circumferentially along the weld line on both run and branch pipes as well as at the run and branch cross sections. In general, this computational model is capable of predicting three dimensional through-thickness welding residual stress, which can be valuable for structural integrity assessments of complex welded geometries.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 12

Residual stresses along Curve A

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Figure 13

Residual stresses along Curve B

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Figure 14

Residual stresses along Curve C

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Figure 7

Stress versus distance in the Y2 direction

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Figure 8

Stress versus distance in the X direction

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Figure 9

Through-thickness residual stress at the weld toe

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Figure 1

Material properties: (a) Temperature-dependent material properties and (b) Stress-strain cuvers at a range of temperatures

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Figure 2

FE mesh of a tee branch junction component

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Figure 3

Detailed FE mesh: (a) Branch cross section a-a and (b) run cross section b-b

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Figure 4

Local coordinate systems along the weld line on Curves A, B, and C: (a) Local coordinate systems along Curve A, (b) Local coordinate systems along Curve B, and (c) Local coordinate systems along Curve C

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Figure 5

Stress versus angular position

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Figure 6

Stress versus distance in the Y1 direction

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Figure 10

Stress versus distance in the Y1 direction

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Figure 11

Stress versus distance in Y2 direction

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