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RESEARCH PAPERS

Strategy of Considering Microstructure Effect on Weld Residual Stress Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Masahito Mochizuki1

Department of Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japanmmochi@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

Masao Toyoda

Department of Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japantoyoda@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 129(4), 619-629 (Oct 18, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2767344 History: Received January 09, 2006; Revised October 18, 2006

Welding generates thermal distortion and residual stress, and it is well known that they affect the performance of welded structures by contributing to brittle fracture, fatigue, buckling deformation, and stress-corrosion cracking. Welding distortions and residual stresses can possibly be controlled and reduced by using countermeasures. Not only thermal stress behavior but also the prediction of the microstructural phase during welding heat cycles is very important. High-strength steels or martensitic stainless steels are used in many power plant components, and the effect of phase transformation on the mechanical behavior during welding of these steels becomes much larger than that of mild steels and austenitic stainless steels. Simultaneous simulations of the thermal stress and microstructure during welding are necessary for a precise evaluation. In this paper, an analytical method and several applications using actual components are introduced in order to emphasize the effect of the microstructure on the weld residual stress analysis.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 4

Examples of material properties with temperature and microstructural dependency. (a) yield stress and (b) CCT diagram

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Figure 22

Effect of turning-back operation on temperature distribution near the heat-affected zone at first-layer side of turning-back side

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Figure 23

Effect of interpass temperature control on maximum temperature near the heat-affected zone at last-layer side of center of weld length

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Figure 24

Example of schematic distribution of residual stress and distortion in an extracted welded joint specimen from a beam-to-column structure

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Figure 1

Coupling relation of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields

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Figure 2

Configuration of a round-bar specimen for simulated welding heat cycle tests

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Figure 3

Apparatus of welding heat cycle test

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Figure 11

Effects of position through thickness direction on mechanical properties in weld metal

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Figure 5

Comparison of temperature histories during welding heat cycles in the free-cooling condition between the results of experiment and simulation

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Figure 6

Examples of microstructural histories during welding heat cycles by numerical simulation. (a) In the normal free-cooling condition with a maximum temperature of 1400°C. (b) In the rapid-cooling condition with a maximum temperature of 1400°C.

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Figure 7

Comparison of axial stress histories between free- and rapid-cooling conditions during welding heat cycles by numerical simulation

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Figure 8

Comparison of axial stress histories between the results of experiment and simulation during welding heat cycles

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Figure 9

Relation between maximum heating temperature and residual stress

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Figure 10

Configurations of a beam-to-column structure and an extracted welded joint specimen

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Figure 12

Effects of weld length and interpass temperature on mechanical properties from tensile specimens at 1∕4 thickness from last-pass side

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Figure 13

Effects of weld length and interpass temperature on Charpy absorbed energy

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Figure 14

Effects of weld length and interpass temperature on critical CTOD

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Figure 15

Comparison of heat input in multipass welded joints

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Figure 16

Comparison of temperature histories during weld process at recommended point by JASS 6

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Figure 17

Distributions of bainitic phase proportion near weld metal: (a) turning-back type and (b) controlled type

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Figure 18

Comparison of Vickers hardness in weld metal

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Figure 19

Distribution of elapsed cooling time t8∕5 in weld metal at last-layer side

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Figure 20

Relation between Vickers hardness and elapsed cooling time t8∕5 in weld metal at last-layer side

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Figure 21

Comparison of Vickers hardness near the heat-affected zone

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