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Research Papers: Pipeline Systems

Failure of X52 Wrinkled Pipelines Subjected to Monotonic Axial Deformation

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. Zhang

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4, Canada

S. Das1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4, Canadasdas@uwindsor.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 130(2), 021702 (Mar 17, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2894294 History: Received April 16, 2007; Revised October 03, 2007; Published March 17, 2008

This study was undertaken to investigate and understand the behavior of a wrinkled energy pipeline when subjected to sustained monotonic axial compressive deformation. This study involved both experimental and numerical investigations. Two full-scale laboratory tests with moderate and high internal pressures on X52 grade steel pipes with a diameter-to-thickness ratio of 45 show that this pipeline is extremely ductile and did not rupture under axisymmetric compressive axial deformation. However, they fail due to the excessive cross-sectional deformation and the final deformed shape looks like an accordion due to the formation of multiple wrinkles. Subsequently, a detailed parametric study using a numerical technique was undertaken to determine the failure condition and failure mode of this pipeline for various realistic internal pressures and diameter-to-thickness ratios. A nonlinear finite element method was used for the numerical study. The numerical model was validated with the data obtained from the two full-scale tests. The parametric study shows that the X52 linepipe loses its integrity due to the rupture in the pipe wall if the internal pressure is low and/or if the pipe has a small diameter-to-thickness ratio. This paper presents and discusses the results obtained both from the experimental and numerical parametric studies.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 15

Influence of pressure on failure mode

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Figure 14

Influence of pressure on failure mode

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Figure 13

Influence of D∕t on failure mode

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Figure 12

Influence of D∕t on failure mode

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Figure 11

Deformed shape of Specimen 1 at L2

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Figure 10

Deformed shape of Specimen 1 at L1

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Figure 9

Local strain versus global strain

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Figure 8

UTS load versus global strain for Specimen 1 from FEA and test

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Figure 7

Typical geometry and boundary condition for pipes

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Figure 6

Schematic of FE model

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Figure 5

Accordion failure for Specimen 1

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Figure 4

UTS load versus UTS stroke for test Specimen 1

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Figure 3

Extensometer attached to pipe wrinkle

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Figure 2

A schematic of test setup

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Figure 1

Typical wrinkle shapes

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