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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

CFD Tool for Assessment of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity in Pressure Thermal Shock Conditions: Influence of Turbulence Model and Mesh Refinement on the Vessel Thermal Loading During PTS Transient

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Martin1

Research and Development Division, Fluid Dynamics Power Generation and Environment Department, Electricité De France, 78400 Chatou, Francealain-cc.martin@edf.fr

S. Benhamadouche

Research and Development Division, Fluid Dynamics Power Generation and Environment Department, Electricité De France, 78400 Chatou, Francesofiane.benhamadouche@edf.fr

G. Bezdikian

Nuclear Production Division, Electricité De France, Cap Ampère, 1 Place Pleyel, 93207 Saint-Denis cedex, France

F. Beaud

Engineering Division, SEPTEN, Electricité De France, 12-14 Avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex, Francefrederic.beaud@edf.fr

F. Lestang

Engineering Division, SEPTEN, Electricité De France, 12-14 Avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex, Francefrederic.lestang@edf.fr

RCCM: French reference fracture toughness curve

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 133(3), 031302 (Apr 07, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3027494 History: Received December 16, 2005; Revised February 28, 2008; Published April 07, 2011; Online April 07, 2011

Integrity evaluation methods for nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading are applied by French Utility. They are based on the analysis of the behavior of relatively shallow cracks under loading PTS conditions due to the emergency cooling during small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) transients. This paper presents the research and development program started at EDF on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) determination of the cooling phenomena of a PWR vessel during a pressurized thermal shock. The numerical results are obtained with the thermal-hydraulic tool Code̱Saturne , in combination with the thermal-solid code SYRTHES to take into account the coupled effect of heat transfer between the fluid flow and the vessel. Based on the global and local thermal-hydraulic analysis of a small break loss of coolant accident transient, this paper presents mainly a parametric study that helps to understand the main phenomena that can lead to better estimating the margin factors. The geometry studied represents a third of a PWR pressure vessel, and the configuration investigated is related to the injection of cold water in the vessel during a SBLOCA transient. Conservative initial and boundary conditions for the CFD calculation are derived from the global thermal-hydraulic analysis. Both the fluid behavior and its impact on the solid part formed by cladding and base metal are considered. The main purpose of the numerical thermal-hydraulic studies is to accurately estimate the distribution of fluid temperature in the downcomer and the heat transfer coefficients on the inner RPV surface for a fracture mechanics computation, which will subsequently assess the associated RPV safety margin factors.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Safety injection nozzle modeling

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Figure 3

Safety injection by pump

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Figure 4

Safety injection by accumulator

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Figure 5

Thermal layers in the cold leg

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Figure 6

Velocity field around the SI nozzle

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Figure 7

Flow separation along the RPV at the beginning of the transient

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Figure 8

Flow separation along the RPV during the transient

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Figure 9

Plume fluctuation on both sides of the downcomer (plume on the left)

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Figure 10

Plume fluctuation on both sides of the downcomer (plume on the right)

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Figure 11

Zoom on the temperature in the thickness of the wall

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Figure 12

Fluid temperature evolution at four altitudes for the two turbulence models

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Figure 13

Solid temperature evolution on two altitudes and three depths for the two turbulence models

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Figure 14

Fluid temperature; comparison of three meshes of the fluid temperature evolution of two altitudes

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Figure 15

Comparison on three meshes of the solid temperature evolution of two altitudes and three depths

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