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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Hole Crack Problems in Infinite Elastic Plate in Tension

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiangqiao Yan, Baoliang Liu

Research Laboratory on Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, P.R. China

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 133(4), 041208 (May 18, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002261 History: Received February 08, 2010; Revised June 21, 2010; Published May 18, 2011; Online May 18, 2011

This paper deals with crack(s) emanating from a hole in infinite elastic plate in tension. Such a crack problem is called a hole crack problem for short. By extending Buckner’s principle suited for a crack to a hole crack problem in infinite plate in tension, here, the original problem (the hole crack problem in infinite plate in tension) is divided into a homogeneous problem (the one without hole crack) subjected to remote loads and a hole crack problem in an unloaded body with applied tractions on the surfaces of the hole and crack. Thus, the results in terms of the stress intensity factors (SIFs) can be obtained by considering the latter problem, which is analyzed easily by means of a hybrid displacement discontinuity (a boundary element method) proposed recently by Yan. Numerical examples are included to illustrate that the numerical approach is very simple and effective for analyzing the hole crack problem in infinite plate in tension. By using the proposed approach, three hole crack problems (i.e., a pair of cracks emanating from an elliptical hole, a pair of cracks emanating from a rhombus hole, and a crack emanating from a triangular hole in infinite plate in tension) are analyzed in detail. By changing the hole geometry form and the hole geometry parameters and by comparing the SIFs of the hole crack problem with those of the center crack problem, the effect of the hole geometry form and the hole geometry parameters on the SIFs is revealed. It is found that a hole has a shielding and an amplifying effect on the SIFs of crack(s) emanating from the hole. The shielding and amplifying effects varied with the hole geometry form and the hole geometry parameters.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A pair of cracks emanating from an elliptical hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 2

A pair of cracks emanating from a rhombus hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 3

A crack emanating from a triangular hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 4

Schematic of constant displacement discontinuity components Dx and Dy (taken from Ref. 8)

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Figure 5

Schematic of the left crack-tip displacement discontinuity element

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Figure 6

A branching crack emanating from an elliptical hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 7

Schematic of a crack emanating from a triangular hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 8

Normalized SIFs of a pair of cracks emanating a circular hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 9

Normalized SIFs of a pair of cracks emanating an elliptical hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 12

Normalized SIFs of a crack emanating a triangular hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 13

Normalized SIFs of a crack emanating a triangular hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 14

Normalized SIFs of circular hole crack, square hole crack, and triangular hole crack

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Figure 11

Normalized SIFs of a pair of cracks emanating a rhombus hole in infinite plate in tension

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Figure 10

Normalized SIFs of a pair of cracks emanating a square hole in infinite plate in tension

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