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Technology Reviews

A Review Paper on Aging Effects in Alloy 617 for Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Weiju Ren

Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6155, Building 4500-S, Oak Ridge, TN 37831renw@ornl.gov

Robert Swimdeman

 Cromtech, 125 Amanda Drive, Oak Ridge, TN 37831rswindeman@comcast.net

Reduced from the initial 1000°C consideration based on analysis results that 950°C can satisfy the application requirements.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 131(2), 024002 (Dec 30, 2008) (15 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2967885 History: Received October 05, 2006; Revised April 25, 2007; Published December 30, 2008

To understand the response of Alloy 617 to long-time exposure conditions and to determine the supplementary data needs for structural components in Gen IV nuclear reactors, literature of aging and aging effects in the alloy was reviewed. Most of the reviewed data were produced in connection with the international research effort supporting high temperature gas-cooled reactor projects in the 1970s and 1980s. Topics considered included microstructural changes, hardness, tensile properties, toughness, creep-rupture, fatigue, and crack growth. It became clear that, for the long-time very high-temperature conditions of the Gen IV reactors, a significant effort would be needed to fully understand and characterize property changes. Several topics for further research were recommended.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Typical microstructure for a mill-annealed Alloy 617 (Heat XX01A3US) (14)

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Figure 2

Content of precipitates in Alloy 617 calculated by THERMOCALC for 1.24% Al (high aluminum) (35)

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Figure 3

Time-temperature-precipitation data for M23C6 carbide in Alloy 617 (2,9,30)

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Figure 4

Time-temperature-precipitation data for M6C carbide in Alloy 617 (2,9,30)

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Figure 5

Time-temperature-precipitation data for Ni3Al carbide in Alloy 617 (2,9,30)

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Figure 6

Alloy 617 hardness versus log time from several investigations

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Figure 7

Hardness versus temperature for the 1000 h aging

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Figure 8

Hardness versus temperature for long-time aging

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Figure 9

Aging effect at several times and temperatures on the room temperature yield and ultimate strengths of a single heat

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Figure 10

Effect of aging at several times and temperatures on the room temperature tensile elongation of a single heat

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Figure 11

Aging effect for 1000 h at several temperatures on the room temperature yield and tensile strengths of two heats

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Figure 12

Effect of aging at several temperatures at long times on the room temperature yield and tensile strengths of two heats of Alloy 617

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Figure 13

Effect of aging at several temperatures to long times on the room temperature elongation of two heats of Alloy 617

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Figure 14

Effect of aging at 871°C on the yield and tensile strengths and the elongation of Alloy 617 at 871°C(14)

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Figure 15

Room temperature Charpy V-notch energy versus the aging time to beyond 10,000 h at four temperatures

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Figure 16

Room temperature Charpy V-notch energy versus the aging temperature for 1000 h of aging

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Figure 17

Typical fracture surface of the CVN specimen fractured at room temperature after long-time aging in the temperature range of 704–871°C(14)

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Figure 18

A creep curve for the annealed Alloy 617 at 950°C and 30 MPa; data source: ORNL test

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Figure 19

Reconstructed creep curve from Ref. 11 showing the effect of aging on the early stages of creep at 950°C

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Figure 20

Microstructure away from the microcracking area showing the uniform distribution of grain boundary carbides after 881 h at 950°C (stress in the vertical direction); source: ORNL test

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Figure 21

Microstructure in the microcracking area showing the preferential distribution of grain boundary carbides on boundaries normal to the tensile stress (vertical direction); source: ORNL test

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Figure 22

Aging effect on the low-cycle fatigue at 538°C(13)

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Figure 23

Aging effect on the low-cycle fatigue at 704°C(13)

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Figure 24

Aging effect on the low-cycle fatigue at 871°C(13)

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