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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Analysis of the Dynamic Response of a Controlled Detonation Chamber

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Simoens1

 Royal Military Academy, Brussels 1000, Belgiumbart.simoens@rma.ac.be

M. H. Lefebvre

 Royal Military Academy, Brussels 1000, Belgium

R. E. Nickell

 Applied Science and Technology, San Diego, CA 92103

F. Minami

 University of Osaka, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

J. K. Asahina

 Kobe Steel Limited, Kobe 657-0845, Japan

It is important to note that this is true in the “near field region,” close to the charge. The further away from a charge, the smaller the difference in pressure and impulse will be between a spherical and a cylindrical charge. In practice, however, closed detonation vessels will generally be used in that near field region, where the shape of the charge is very important.

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 133(5), 051209 (Jul 14, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003469 History: Received July 27, 2010; Revised November 30, 2010; Published July 14, 2011; Online July 14, 2011

Detonation chambers (either mobile or fixed) are used worldwide for a wide range of applications. At present, a 1/7 scale model of a 1 ton detonation chamber is available for extended testing in Belgium. The chamber is a single wall cylindrical vessel with semielliptical ends. Each time an explosive charge is fired in the vessel, that vessel is submitted to a number of deformation cycles. A series of strain gauges measures the deformation of the vessel walls. Experimental peak strains and vibration frequency can be compared with predicted values based on simple formulas. Measured values are reasonably close to the estimated values. The influence of the shape of the charge is studied. The shape has an important influence on the chamber response. For a fixed charge mass, a spherical charge causes less deformation than a cylindrical charge and is therefore advantageous from a fatigue point of view.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The scaled model detonation chamber and the different charges fired

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Figure 2

Peak strains on the centerline: calculation and experiment

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Figure 3

Peak strains on the centerline: calculation and experiment, using a multiplier of 1.35 on impulse

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Figure 4

Period of the first cycle on the centerline: calculation and experiment

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Figure 5

Strain rate in the first cycle on the centerline: calculation and experiment

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Figure 6

Simulated environment (AUTODYN )

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Figure 7

Results of the simulations: reflected impulse in function of length-to-diameter ratio

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Figure 8

Results of the 3D simulations: peak strain on the centerline in function of length-to-diameter ratio

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Figure 9

Experimental results on the centerline for different length-to-diameter ratios

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Figure 10

Combined experimental and simulated results on the centerline for different length-to-diameter ratios

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Figure 11

Decreasing peak strain on the centerline for different identical shots with 3 kg of emulsion

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Figure 12

Peak strains on the chamber wall for different length-to-diameter ratios

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