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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Creep Behavior of Pressurized Tank Composed of Functionally Graded Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
JianJun Chen1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156756, Korea; School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, Chinachenjj@wm.cau.ac.kr

KeeBong Yoon

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156756, Korea

Shan-Tung Tu

School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 133(5), 051401 (Jul 11, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003455 History: Received September 17, 2008; Revised January 04, 2011; Published July 11, 2011; Online July 11, 2011

The creep behavior of a pressurized tank, which is assumed to be made of functionally graded materials, is studied in this paper. The elastic response under the internal and external pressures is first obtained when Young’s modulus obeys a power function along with the wall thickness. If the creep exponent remains constant and the creep coefficient varies with the radial coordinate, a closed-form solution can be derived for the time-dependent behavior of the spherical tank. The effects of material gradients on the creep stress and strain are investigated in detail. The results show that the stress level under the steady creep state is determined by the distribution of the creep properties. However, the magnitude of the creep strain is influenced by the elastic modulus distribution, as well as the creep property distribution inside the functionally graded materials. Compared with the finite element analysis results, the optimum time step value is also investigated. Some fundamental knowledge of the materials distribution is achieved to reduce the maximum creep stress/strain and to uniformize the stress level inside the functionally graded materials tank.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Geometry of functionally graded materials tank (pi=50 MPa)

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Figure 2

Evolution of circumferential stress at inner surface with different time steps (pi=50 MPa)

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Figure 3

Evolution of circumferential stress for different elastic graded factors: (a) at inner surface and (b) at outer surface (pi=50 MPa)

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Figure 4

Evolution of strain components with different elastic graded factors: (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain (pi=50 MPa)

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Figure 5

Evolution of circumferential stress at inner and outer surface: (a) under internal pressure (pi=50 MPa) and (b) under external pressure (po=50 MPa)

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Figure 6

Evolution of strain components in FGM tank under internal pressure: (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain

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Figure 7

Stress distribution along FGM tank wall under internal pressure (pi=50 MPa): (a) radial stress and (b) circumferential stress

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Figure 8

Strain distribution along FGMs tank wall under internal pressure (pi=50 MPa): (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain

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Figure 9

Evolution of strain components in FGMs tank under external pressure (po=50 MPa): (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain

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Figure 10

Stress distribution along FGMs tank wall under external pressure (po=50 MPa): (a) radial stress and (b) circumferential stress

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Figure 11

Strain distribution along FGMs tank wall under external pressure (po=50 MPa): (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain

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Figure 15

Distribution of strain components with different graded creep properties: (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain

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Figure 14

Distribution of stress components with different creep property distributions: (a) radial stress and (b) circumferential stress

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Figure 13

Evolution of strain components with different creep property distributions: (a) radial strain and (b) circumferential strain

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Figure 12

Evolution of circumferential stress with different graded creep properties

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