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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Incorporation of Strain Hardening Effect Into Simplified Limit Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
P. S. Reddy Gudimetla1

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3X5, Canadap.gudimetla@mun.ca

R. Adibi-Asl, R. Seshadri

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3X5, Canada

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 132(6), 061201 (Oct 13, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002059 History: Received February 23, 2010; Revised June 11, 2010; Published October 13, 2010; Online October 13, 2010

In this paper, a method for determining limit loads in the components or structures by incorporating strain hardening effects is presented. This has been done by including a certain amount of the strain hardening into limit load analysis, which normally idealizes the material to be elastic perfectly plastic. Typical strain hardening curves such as bilinear hardening and Ramberg–Osgood material models are investigated. This paper also focuses on the plastic reference volume correction concept to determine the active volume participating in plastic collapse. The reference volume concept in combination with mα-tangent method is used to estimate lower-bound limit loads of different components. Lower-bound limit loads obtained compare well with the nonlinear finite element analysis results for several typical configurations with/without crack.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Illustrative determination of σy∗

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Figure 2

Bilinear hardening material model

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Figure 3

Plot of m0 versus V¯η

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Figure 4

Thick walled cylinder: (a) geometry and dimensions and (b) typical finite element mesh with loading

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Figure 5

Variation of m0(VRp) and mαT(VRp) with iterations for bilinear hardening thick cylinder (EMAP)

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Figure 6

Variation of m0(VRp) and mαT(VRp) with iterations for Ramberg–Osgood hardening thick cylinder (EMAP)

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Figure 7

CT specimen: (a) geometry and dimensions and (b) typical finite element mesh with loading

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Figure 8

Variation of m0(VRp) and mαT(VRp) with iterations for bilinear hardening CT specimen (EMAP)

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Figure 9

Variation of m0(VRp) and mαT(VRp) with iterations for Ramberg–Osgood hardening CT specimen (EMAP)

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Figure 10

Indeterminate beam: (a) geometry and dimensions and (b) typical finite element mesh with loading

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Figure 11

Variation of m0(VRp) and mαT(VRp) with iterations for bilinear hardening indeterminate beam (EMAP)

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Figure 12

Variation of m0(VRp) and mαT(VRp) with iterations for Ramberg–Osgood hardening indeterminate beam (EMAP)

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