0
Research Papers: Design and Analysis

An Inverse Method for Reconstruction of the Residual Stress Field in Welded Plates

[+] Author and Article Information
G. H. Farrahi

School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 1458889694, Iranfarrahi@sharif.edu

S. A. Faghidian

School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 1458889694, Iranfaghidian@gmail.com

D. J. Smith

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR, UKDavid.Smith@bristol.ac.uk

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 132(6), 061205 (Oct 15, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001268 History: Received July 20, 2009; Revised February 12, 2010; Published October 15, 2010; Online October 15, 2010

Welding process is widely used in manufacturing of many important engineering components. For such structures, the most important problem is the development of residual stresses and distortion due to welding. Welding tensile residual stresses have a detrimental effect and play an important role in an industrial environment. Crack initiation and propagation in static or fatigue loading, or in stress corrosion can be greatly accelerated by welding tensile stresses. Practically, however, it is often very difficult to characterize the residual stress state completely, while the knowledge of the complete residual stress distribution in structures is essential for assessing their safety and durability. In this research, based on the concept of the Airy stress function, an inverse approach would be presented to reconstruct the residual stress field from limited incomplete measurements of the residual stresses existing in a welded plate. In contrast to the published methods, a general solution based on the approximated stress function would be proposed together with satisfying all of the requirements of continuum mechanics; also, there exist a flexibility to impose the type of the physical behavior of residual stresses to attain the meaningful stress field. The efficiency of the method has been demonstrated by achieving an excellent agreement between the model prediction and experimental measured stresses in the sense of least-square approximation; also, the solution of the inverse problem has been stabilized using the Tikhonov–Morozov stabilization theory.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Geometry of the domain for the general solution

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Geometry of the lower half of the welded plate (16)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

X-ray diffraction measurement of the residual longitudinal stress at line 1 (16)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

X-ray diffraction measurement of the residual longitudinal stress at line 2 (16)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

X-ray diffraction measurement of the residual longitudinal stress at line 3 (16)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Reconstructed longitudinal residual stresses compared with the X-ray diffraction and Korsunsky results along line 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Reconstructed longitudinal residual stresses compared with the X-ray diffraction and Korsunsky results along line 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Reconstructed longitudinal residual stresses compared with the X-ray diffraction and Korsunsky results along line 3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Contour plot of the reconstructed longitudinal residual stress component in the lower half of the welded plate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Contour plot of the reconstructed transversal residual stress component in the lower half of the welded plate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Contour plot of the reconstructed shear residual stress component in the lower half of the welded plate

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In