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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Instability of Pressure Relief Valves in Water Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Moussou1

 LaMSID, UMR CNRS-EDF 2832, 92141 Clamart, Francepierre.moussou@edf.fr

R. J. Gibert

 RJG Consulting, 44 Bd Voltaire, F-75011 Paris, Francerjgibert@orange.fr

G. Brasseur

Department of Analysis in Mechanics and Acoustics, EDF R&D, F-92141 Clamart, Francegilles.brasseur@edf.fr

Ch. Teygeman

Department of Materials and Mechanics of Components, EDF R&D, F-77818 Moret-sur-Loing, Francechristophe.teygeman@edf.fr

J. Ferrari

Department of Materials and Mechanics of Components, EDF R&D, F-77818 Moret-sur-Loing, Francejerome.ferrari@edf.fr

J. F. Rit

Department of Materials and Mechanics of Components, EDF R&D, F-77818 Moret-sur-Loing, Francej-f.rit@edf.fr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 132(4), 041308 (Aug 05, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002164 History: Received October 08, 2009; Revised July 07, 2010; Published August 05, 2010; Online August 05, 2010

Pressure relief valves in water pipes are known to sometimes chatter when the inlet pressure slightly exceeds the set pressure. While these devices are responsible for numerous fatigue issues in process industries, there is a relatively low number of technical publications covering their performance, especially in heavy fluid applications. The present study is intended as a contribution to the understanding of pressure relief valve dynamics, taking into account fluid-structure interactions. A series of tests were performed with a water relief valve in a test rig. Adjusting the set pressure of the valve to about 30 bars, an upstream pressure varying from 20 bars to 35 bars was imposed, so that the valve opened and the water flow varied from a few m3/h to about 80m3/h. During the tests, the pipe was equipped upstream and downstream of the valve with static pressure sensors and a flowmeter, the disk lift was measured with a laser displacement sensor, and the spring force was recorded simultaneously. Several fluctuating pressure sensors were also installed in the inlet pipe. Static instability is investigated by comparing the spring force to the hydraulic force. Dynamic instability is observed and it is shown that the resonant behavior of the disk generates an apparent negative pressure drop coefficient at some frequencies. This negative pressure drop coefficient can trigger a dynamic instability in a manner similar to the negative damping effect in leakage-flow vibrations.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Arrangement of the test rig and location of the sensors

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Figure 2

View of the pressure relief valve

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Figure 3

Sketch of the dynamic representation of the valve

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Figure 4

Pressure drop coefficient of the valve as a function of the lift determined in steady conditions

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Figure 5

Equivalent surface of the valve as a function of the lift determined in steady conditions

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Figure 6

Modulus of the upstream acoustic reflection coefficient measured during two different tests

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Figure 7

Phase of the upstream acoustic reflection coefficient measured during two different tests

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Figure 8

Stable and unstable lift values as a function of the tank pressure

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Figure 9

Lift versus inlet pressure curve observed during steady tests

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Figure 10

Spontaneous instabilities of the pressure relief valve

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Figure 11

Dynamic instability observed for a small value of the lift (test No. 78)

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Figure 12

Dynamic instability observed for a large value of the lift (test No. 84)

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Figure 13

Frequency range of dynamic instability (lower frequency: dashed line and higher frequency: plain line)

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Figure 14

Pressure and fluid velocity inside the valve for a fixed disk

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Figure 15

Pressure and fluid velocity inside the valve for a disk moving with a velocity equal to 5 m/s

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