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Technical Briefs

Stress-Strain Behavior of an Aluminum Alloy Under Transient Strain-Rates

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. W. Kwon1

Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943

Y. Esmaeili

Department of Mechanical & Environmental Engineering, University of California-Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106

C. M. Park

Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 133(4), 044501 (Jun 03, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003470 History: Received September 10, 2010; Revised November 09, 2010; Published June 03, 2011; Online June 03, 2011

Because most structures are subjected to transient strain-rate loading, an experimental study was conducted to investigate the stress-strain behaviors of an aluminum alloy undergoing varying strain-rate loading. To this end, uniaxial tensile loading was applied to coupons of dog-bone shape such that each coupon underwent two or three different strain-rates, i.e., one rate after another. As a basis, a series of single-strain-rate tests was also conducted with strain-rates of 0.110.0s1. When the material experienced multistrain-rate loading, the stress-strain curves were significantly different from any single-strain-rate stress-strain curve. The strain-rate history affected the stress-strain curves under multistrain-rate loading. As a result, some simple averaging of single-strain-rate curves did not predict the actual multistrain-rate stress-strain curve properly. Furthermore, the fracture strain under multistrain-rate loading was significantly different from that under any single-strain-rate case. Depending on the applied strain-rates and their sequences, the former was much greater or less than the latter. A technique was proposed based on the residual plastic strain and plastic energy density in order to predict the fracture strain under multistrain-rate loading. The predicted fracture strains generally agreed well with the experimental data. Another observation that was made was that the unloading stress-strain curve was not affected by the previous strain-rate history.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Plot of stress-strain curves for different constant strain-rates

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Figure 2

Stress-strain curve under two-strain-rate from 0.1 s−1 to 10.0 s−1

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Figure 3

Stress-strain curve under two-strain-rate from 10.0 s−1 to 0.1 s−1

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Figure 4

Stress-strain curve under two-strain-rate from 10.0 s−1 to 0.1 s−1

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Figure 5

Stress-strain curves under two-strain-rates of 5.0 s−1 and 10.0 s−1

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Figure 6

Stress-strain curves under three-strain-rates of 0.1 s−1, 5.0 s−1, and 10.0 s−1

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Figure 7

Stress-strain curves with unloading after applying two different strain-rates

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