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Research Papers: Codes and Standards

An Approach to Derive Primary Bending Stress From Finite Element Analysis for Pressure Vessels and Applications in Structural Design

[+] Author and Article Information
Bingjun Gao

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130, Chinabjgao@hebut.edu.cn

Xiaohui Chen

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130, Chinahuixiao_chen@126.com

Xiaoping Shi

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130, Chinaxpshi@hebut.edu.cn

Junhua Dong

School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130, Chinadjh2006@hebut.edu.cn

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 132(6), 061101 (Oct 15, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001656 History: Received September 24, 2009; Revised March 29, 2010; Published October 15, 2010; Online October 15, 2010

An important issue in engineering application of the “design by analysis” approach in pressure vessel design is how to decompose an overall stress field obtained by finite element analysis into different stress categories defined in the ASME B&PV Codes III and VIII-2. In many pressure vessel structures, it is difficult to obtain PL+Pb due to the lack of information about primary bending stress. In this paper, a simple approach to derive the primary bending stress from the finite element analysis was proposed with application examples and verifications. According to the relationship of the bending stress and applied loads or the relationship of the bending stress and displacement agreement, it is possible to identify loads causing primary bending stress for typical pressure vessel structures. By applying the load inducing primary bending stress alone and necessary superposition, the primary bending stress and corresponding stress intensity PL+Pb can be determined for vessel design, especially for axisymmetric problems.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Load decomposing of typical pressure vessel component: (a) cylinder with flat head; (b) nozzle of the small end of conical head; (c) nozzle of spherical shell; (d) connection of flange and cylinder

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Figure 2

Geometry of nozzle at small end of conical shell

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Figure 3

FEA results of nozzle at small end of conical shell with α=45 deg: (a) stress intensity contour; (b) strain intensity contour before collapse; (c) determination of limit pressure

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Figure 4

Geometry of intersection region of nozzle and spherical shell

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Figure 5

FEA results in connection region of a nozzle and spherical head with nozzle thickness of 4 mm: (a) stress intensity contour; (b) strain intensity contour before collapse; (c) determination of limit pressure

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Figure 6

Stress classification lines for structure of Fig. 4

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Figure 7

Geometry of the connecting region of flange and cylinder

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Figure 8

FEA results for the connecting region of flange and cylinder with cylinder thickness of 12 mm: (a) stress intensity contour; (b) strain intensity contour before collapse; (c) determination of limit pressure

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