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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Finite Element Modeling of a Lightweight Composite Blast Containment Vessel

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohamed B. Trabia

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454027, Las Vegas, NV 89154mbt@me.unlv.edu

Brendan J. O’Toole

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454027, Las Vegas, NV 89154bj@me.unlv.edu

Jagadeep Thota

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454027, Las Vegas, NV 89154jagthota@egr.unlv.edu

Kiran K. Matta

 Butler International Inc., Peoria, IL 61523mattakiran@yahoo.com

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 130(1), 011205 (Jan 17, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2826437 History: Received August 01, 2006; Revised January 10, 2007; Published January 17, 2008

This paper presents various approaches for finite element modeling of a cylindrical lightweight composite vessel for blast containment purposes. The vessel has a steel liner that is internally reinforced with throttle and gusset steel plates and wrapped with a basalt fiber∕epoxy composite. The vessel design is fairly complex, including many geometric details and several components with different material models. The objective of this work is to determine an accurate and efficient procedure for modeling this type of vessels. This model can be used within an iterative optimization process. Different modeling approaches using various combinations of element types, material models, and geometric details are explored. Results of these models are compared to available experimental data. Accuracy and computational time between all these models are also compared. A suitable modeling method is recommended based on these findings.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

AT595 blast containment vessel

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Figure 2

Engineering stress-strain curve for the polymer-foam material

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Figure 5

Detailed view of end-cap portion of Model 2

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Figure 7

Detailed view of throttle plate and gusset plate of Model 3

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Figure 8

Detailed view of end-cap portion of Model 3

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Figure 10

Comparison of peak circumferential strains at different locations

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Figure 11

Comparison of circumferential strain at the central region for models 1–4 with respect to results of DRAKON

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Figure 12

Pressure profile for Model 1 at the central region of the vessel

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Figure 14

Comparison of peak circumferential strains at different locations for Model 5

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Figure 15

Peak circumferential strain of 2.27% in Model 5 at 0.54ms

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Figure 16

Comparison of circumferential strain at the central region for Model 5 with respect to results of DRAKON

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