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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

An Inverse Method for the Determination of Thermal Stress-Intensity Factors Under Arbitrary Thermal-Shocks

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Meeker

Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

A. E. Segall

Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802aesegall@psu.edu

E. Gondar

Mechanical Engineering College, Slovak University of Technology, 83102 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 130(4), 041206 (Aug 21, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2967737 History: Received December 11, 2006; Revised September 20, 2007; Published August 21, 2008

The analysis of stress-intensity factors is of immense importance when designing vessels, pipes, and end-caps as well as supporting structures and plates seen in high-temperature applications. Given this importance and the difficulty of measuring actual thermal boundary conditions, a generalized series based on a new and infinitely differentiable polynomial was employed to inversely determine the transient temperature distribution in a semi-infinite slab using only a single temperature history. These temperature distributions were in turn used to find the potential crack-opening stresses throughout the body. Using the found stresses and a weight-function approach, stress-intensity factors were then determined for both edge and semi-elliptical cracks under an arbitrary thermal-shock. When compared to other methods for various thermal scenarios, the method showed good agreement for both edge- and semi-elliptical surface cracks.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Edge-cracked slab with a thickness h and a crack length a

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Figure 2

Temperature distributions from a triangular surface temperature at various depth-to-thickness ratios

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Figure 3

Stresses from a triangular surface temperature at various depth-to-thickness ratios

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Figure 4

Stress-intensity for an edge-crack subjected to a triangular surface temperature at a crack depth-to-thickness ratio of 0.1

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Figure 5

Stress-intensity for an edge-crack subjected to a triangular surface temperature at a crack depth-to-thickness ratio of 0.2

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Figure 6

Stress-intensity for an edge-crack subjected to a triangular surface temperature at a crack depth-to-thickness ratio of 0.3

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Figure 7

Semi-elliptical cracked slab with thickness h, crack depth a, and crack thickness 2c

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Figure 8

Inverted thermal load compared with the polynomial fit and inverse load

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Figure 9

Comparison of stress-intensity from an edge crack solution to a semi-elliptical crack solution

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