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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Failure Modes of Perforated Material Under Finite Deformation

[+] Author and Article Information
Xinjian Duan1

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada

Arnaud Weck, David S. Wilkinson

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada

Don R. Metzger1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada

1

Present address: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5K 1B2.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 130(4), 041208 (Sep 19, 2008) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2967881 History: Received April 28, 2006; Revised May 08, 2007; Published September 19, 2008

Local deformation due to the interaction of small scale features such as voids or hard particles is expected to have a significant influence on the failure mode of a material. To this end, the fracture pattern of a perforated aluminum sheet is studied experimentally and numerically using finite element models on two different length scales: a full-scale structural model and a local cell model based on large deformation theory. Through the appropriate application of boundary conditions, the more efficient local cell model is shown to produce almost the same results as the full structural model. It is also found that the failure path is significantly affected by the loading conditions (uniaxial versus biaxial) and the hole distribution pattern. By plotting the instantaneous contours of the plastic strain rate, the fracture path can clearly be distinguished by the time that the overall engineering strain reaches approximately 3%. This model developed here has great potential to assess the integrity of high pressure components such as tubesheet.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

Sequence of deformation for the randomly distributed holes observed under in situ SEM. Loading is in the horizontal direction.

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Figure 4

Prediction of the sequence of deformation under uniaxial loading for the random hole pattern. The contour plot in (a)–(c) is total equivalent plastic strain. The contour plot in (d) is equivalent plastic strain rate. The percentage of deformation under each figure is nominal strain applied to the whole unit cell. (a) 1.075%; (b) 2.17%, (c) 3.19%, and (d) 6.74%.

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Figure 5

Predicted fracture pattern for the randomly distributed holes under uniaxial loading

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Figure 6

Sequence of deformation for the triangular pattern of holes observed in situ SEM. Loading is in the vertical direction.

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Figure 7

Failure mode for the triangular pattern of holes observed under in situ SEM. Loading is in the vertical direction.

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Figure 8

Predicted failure modes for the triangular pattern of holes

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Figure 1

Structural model and the distribution of holes

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Figure 11

Distribution of plastic rate under balanced biaxial loading

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Figure 10

Distribution of the equivalent plastic strain under balanced biaxial loading

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Figure 9

Profile variation of Edges 1 and 2 under uniaxial loading

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