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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Prediction of Flow-Induced Vibrations in Tubular Heat Exchangers—Part I: Numerical Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. A. Khulief1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, KFUPM Box 1767, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabiakhulief@kfupm.edu.sa

S. A. Al-Kaabi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, KFUPM Box 1767, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabiakaabis@kfupm.edu.sa

S. A. Said

Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, KFUPM Box 1767, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabiasamsaid@kfupm.edu.sa

M. Anis

Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, KFUPM Box 1767, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabiaanisqasm@kfupm.edu.sa

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 131(1), 011301 (Nov 10, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3006950 History: Received January 04, 2007; Revised April 27, 2008; Published November 10, 2008

Flow-induced vibrations due to crossflow in the shell side of heat exchangers pose a problem of major interest to researchers and practicing engineers. Tube array vibrations may lead to tube failure due to fretting wear and fatigue. Such failures have resulted in numerous plant shutdowns, which are often very costly. The need for accurate prediction of vibration and wear of heat exchangers in service has placed greater emphasis on the improved modeling of the associated phenomenon of flow-induced vibrations. In this study, the elastodynamic model of the tube array is modeled using the finite element approach, wherein each tube is modeled by a set of finite tube elements. The interaction between tubes in the bundle is represented by fluidelastic coupling forces, which are defined in terms of the multidegree-of-freedom elastodynamic behavior of each tube in the bundle. Explicit expressions of the finite element coefficient matrices are derived. The model admits experimentally identified fluidelastic force coefficients to establish the final form of equations of motion. The nonlinear complex eigenvalue problem is formulated and solved to determine the onset of fluidelastic instability for a given set of operating parameters.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The generalized coordinate system

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Figure 2

Nodal coordinates of the tube element

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Figure 3

Instrumented tube array arrangement

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Figure 4

Effect of pitch-diameter-ratio

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