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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Multiaxial Fatigue of 16MnR Steel

[+] Author and Article Information
Zengliang Gao, Xiaogui Wang

College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014, China

Tianwen Zhao

Department of Mechanical Engineering (312), University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV 89557

Yanyao Jiang1

Department of Mechanical Engineering (312), University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV 89557yjiang@unr.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 131(2), 021403 (Dec 11, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3008041 History: Received February 27, 2007; Revised July 18, 2007; Published December 11, 2008

Uniaxial, torsion, and axial-torsion fatigue experiments were conducted on a pressure vessel steel, 16MnR, in ambient air. The uniaxial experiments were conducted using solid cylindrical specimens. Axial-torsion experiments employed thin-walled tubular specimens subjected to proportional and nonproportional loading. The true fracture stress and strain were obtained by testing solid shafts under monotonic torsion. Experimental results reveal that the material under investigation does not display significant nonproportional hardening. The material was found to display shear cracking under pure shear loading but tensile cracking under tension-compression loading. Two critical plane multiaxial fatigue criteria, namely, the Fatemi–Socie criterion and the Jiang criterion, were evaluated based on the experimental results. The Fatemi–Socie criterion combines the maximum shear strain amplitude with a consideration of the normal stress on the critical plane. The Jiang criterion makes use of the plastic strain energy on a material plane as the major contributor to the fatigue damage. Both criteria were found to correlate well with the experiments in terms of fatigue life. The predicted cracking directions by the criteria were less satisfactory when comparing with the experimentally observed cracking behavior under different loading conditions.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Specimens and orientation of the specimens taken from the plate (all dimensions in millimeters): (a) solid specimen for uniaxial loading, (b) solid shaft for torsion, (c) tubular specimen for axial-torsion loading, and (d) orientation of the specimen taken from the plate

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Figure 2

Microstructure of 16MnR

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Figure 3

Monotonic stress-strain curve

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Figure 4

Monotonic shear stress-shear strain curve

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Figure 5

Strain-life fatigue curve from fully reversed uniaxial experiments

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Figure 6

Cyclic stress-stain curve

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Figure 7

Loading paths: (a) 90deg out-of-phase axial-torsion, (b) proportional axial-torsion, and (c) and (d) linear axial-torsion

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Figure 8

Base line experimental data for determining the fatigue constants in the Fatemi–Socie criterion

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Figure 9

Comparison of observed fatigue life and prediction obtained by using the Fatemi–Socie criterion (Eq. 2)

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Figure 10

Comparison of the observed fatigue life and prediction obtained from using the Jiang criterion (Eqs. 4,5)

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Figure 11

Determination of the predicted cracking orientation

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Figure 12

Comparison of the experimentally observed cracking orientation with the predictions based on the Fatemi–Socie criterion for the tubular specimens under combined axial-torsion loading

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Figure 13

Comparison of the experimentally observed cracking orientation with the predictions based on the Jiang criterion for the tubular specimens under combined axial-torsion loading

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Figure 14

Cyclic stress-plastic strain curve for 16MnR steel

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