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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Predicting Erosion-Corrosion Induced by the Interactions Between Multiphase Flow and Structure in Piping System

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Tang, J. Y. Zheng, S. Z. He

Institute of Chemical Engineering Process and Machinery, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China

J. Yang1

Institute of Chemical Engineering Process and Machinery, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Chinazdhjkz@zju.edu.cn

C. K. Lam

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704

I. Wong

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 131(6), 061301 (Sep 23, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000063 History: Received January 01, 2009; Revised July 24, 2009; Published September 23, 2009

Erosion-corrosion failures frequently found in piping systems can lead to the leakage of pipes, or even damage of the whole system. Erosion-corrosion is a form of material degradation that involves electrochemical corrosion and mechanical wear processes encountered on the surface of metal pipes. Fluid-structure interactions have a profound influence on such erosion-corrosion phenomena. This paper is focused on the multiphase flow-induced erosion-corrosion phenomena in pipes, with multiscale analysis, to study the interactions between the flow and the protective film inside the piping system. The shear stress and the pressure of the flow in a pipe with a step were first obtained using a multiphase flow dynamic analysis. The erosion-corrosion rules of the pipes under the multiphase flow were then summarized. Using the microscale flow simulation method, the fluid-structure interaction between the flow and the protective film at the critical position was modeled. The deformation of the protective films was shown to vary with the flow velocity and the corresponding flow regime. According to the simulation results of the fluid-structure interaction, the location, rate, and extent of the erosion-corrosion on pipe surfaces can be predicted. The prediction was also proven by actual instances. Moreover, the method can be used in optimizing the design of the inner sleeves of pipes.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

A sketch of the general structure of a REAC system

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Figure 3

The modeling and meshing at the entrance of the fifth row pipes with liner

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Figure 4

The contours of the wall shear stress (Pa) along the length

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Figure 1

The equipment for hydrocracking process

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Figure 6

The minimum of wall thickness at the erosion failure position

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Figure 7

The contours of the volume fraction (%) of the water phase

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Figure 14

The deformation of the film and the interaction between the flow and the film

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Figure 15

Variation in the deformation of the film with different inlet velocities at different times

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Figure 8

The contours of the volume fraction (%) of the water phase on the section along the length

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Figure 9

The contours of the volume fraction (%) of the water phase on the section with 38 mm distance from the step

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Figure 5

The whole damaged pipes of a REAC system

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Figure 10

Computation domain of the interaction between the multiphase flow and the protective film

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Figure 11

The distribution of the velocities in the inlet and outlet cross sections

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Figure 12

Variation in the deformation of the film with time at different values of the Young’s modulus

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Figure 13

Variation in the deformation of the film with time at different values of the Poisson’s ratio

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