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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

A Model for Predicting Temperature of Electrofusion Joints for Polyethylene Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
Jianfeng Shi, Yongquan Qin

Institute of Chemical Machinery and Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. China

Jinyang Zheng1

Institute of Chemical Machinery and Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. Chinajyzh@zju.edu.cn

Weican Guo

Institute of Chemical Machinery and Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. China; Zhejiang Inspection Center of Special Equipment, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310020, P. R. China

Ping Xu

Department of Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. China

Shangzhi Zuo

 China Inspection Center of Special Equipment, Beijing, Beijing 100013, P. R. China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 131(6), 061403 (Oct 08, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000202 History: Received August 31, 2008; Revised July 31, 2009; Published October 08, 2009

With the increasing application of electrofusion (EF) welding in connecting polyethylene (PE) pipes for gas distribution, more effort has been invested to ensure the safety of the pipeline systems. The objective of this paper is to investigate and understand the temperature distribution during EF welding. A one-dimensional transient heat-transfer model was proposed, taking the variation in the rate of power input, the phase transition of PE, and the thermal contact conductance between heating wire and PE into consideration. Then, experiments were designed to verify the power input and the temperature. The measured values of the power input were shown to be in good agreement with the analytical results. Based on ultrasonic test (UT), a new “Eigen-line” method was presented, which overcomes the difficulties found in the thermocouples’ temperature measurements. The results demonstrate good agreements between prediction and experiment. Finally, based on the presented model, a detailed parametric study was carried out to investigate the influences of the variation in the power input, the physical properties of PE, and the thermal contact conductance between heating wire and surrounding PE.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Electrofusion joint: (a) schematic sketch of an EF coupler and (b) schematic sketch of an EF model

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Figure 2

Thermal conductivity and density of PE

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Figure 3

DSC result of the specific heat capacity

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Figure 4

Installation of thermocouple

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Figure 5

Automatic temperature measuring setup

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Figure 6

UT experimental setup

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Figure 7

Variation in input energy with input voltages

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Figure 8

Comparison of power over time between experimental and analytical results

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Figure 9

Comparison between measured temperatures of welding interface and analytical results

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Figure 10

Ultrasonic contrast tests of joints with different welding times: (a) 30% t0, (b) 40% t0, (c) 60% t0, (d) 80% t0, (e) 100% t0, and (f) 120% t0

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Figure 11

A comparison of the distance between the Eigen-line and heating wire using numerically modeled data and measured data

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Figure 12

Effect of temperature-dependent power input

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Figure 13

Effect of specific heat capacity

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Figure 14

Effect of thermal conductivity

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Figure 15

Effect of latent enthalpy

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Figure 16

Effect of thermal contact conductance

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