0
Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Influence of Cooling Rate on Predicted Weld Residual Stress Buildup in a Thick-Walled Piping Intersection

[+] Author and Article Information
Wei Jiang

School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Chinajiangwei@dlut.edu.cn

Kadda Yahiaoui

School of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Wolverhampton, City Campus, Wolverhampton WV1 1SB, UKk.yahiaoui@wlv.ac.uk

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 132(2), 021205 (Mar 30, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000634 History: Received May 16, 2008; Revised October 20, 2009; Published March 30, 2010; Online March 30, 2010

Welded, thick-walled piping intersections are widely used in many engineering applications including the offshore and nuclear power industries. These components are often fabricated by multipass welding, which inevitably introduces undesirable residual stresses. In this paper, weld-induced residual stresses in a thick-walled piping intersection were predicted using a validated, full three dimensional, sequentially coupled thermomechanical finite element modeling technique. The moving heat source was simulated by imposing body heat flux onto the newly activated elements progressing along the circumferential weld path around the intersection during each pass. The effect of cooling rate on the final residual stress state, especially at critical areas where the peak residual stresses are located, was then investigated by applying different convective heat transfer coefficients to the exposed piping intersection surfaces. It was found that the magnitudes and overall spatial distributions of residual stresses were very sensitive to cooling rate. Residual stresses on the outer surfaces of the component can be significantly reduced by external cooling. On the other hand, cooling the inner surfaces can dramatically convert residual stresses from tensile to compressive in these regions. The results and modeling technique presented in this paper show that residual stress profiles in multipass welded complex geometries can be efficiently optimized through convenient cooling rate control.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Residual stresses in the Y2-direction on the branch outer surface: (a) hoop stress and (b) axial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Residual stresses in the X-direction on the run outer surface: (a) hoop stress and (b) axial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Residual stresses in the Y1-direction on the branch inner surface: (a) hoop stress and (b) axial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Residual stress distributions along Curve B: (a) tangential stress and (b) normal stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Residual stress distributions along Curve C: (a) tangential stress and (b) normal stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Residual stress distributions along Curve A: (a) tangential stress and (b) normal stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Residual stresses in the Y2-direction on the branch outer surface: (a) hoop stress and (b) axial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Residual stresses in the Y1-direction on the branch inner surface: (a) hoop stress and (b) axial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Stress versus angular position on the run pipe outer surface: (a) hoop stress and (b) axial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Local coordinate systems along the weldline on Curves A, B, and C: (a) local coordinate systems along Curve A, (b) local coordinate systems along Curve B, and (c) local coordinate systems along Curve C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Temperature dependent material properties

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

FE model of a thick welded piping intersection: (a) FE mesh, (b) run cross section b-b, and (c) welding sequences

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In