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Research Papers

Influence of Rotating Band Construction on Gun Tube Loading—Part I: Numerical Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Heikki Keinänen

 VTT Technical Research Center of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Finlandheikki.keinanen@vtt.fi

Seppo Moilanen

 Patria Land Systems Oy, P.O. Box 18, FI-38201 Sastamala, Finlandseppo.moilanen@patria.fi

Janne Tervokoski

 Patria Land Systems Oy, P.O. Box 18, FI-38201 Sastamala, Finlandjanne.tervokoski@patria.fi

Juha Toivola

Mekalyysi Oy, Myllymäentie 5, FI-37960 Sotkia, Finlandjuha.toivola@mekalyysi.inet.fi

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 134(4), 041006 (Aug 08, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006354 History: Received December 19, 2011; Revised February 28, 2012; Published July 09, 2012; Online August 08, 2012

The effects of changes in geometries and material properties of rotating band and long range artillery projectile shell body on gun tube stress are presented. The results are based on numerical calculations (finite element analysis, FEA). Numerical explicit dynamic analyses were performed assuming elastic–plastic material behavior and nonlinear kinematics. Mechanical loading of shell body was controlled by pressure–time relationship based on the simulation of internal ballistic cycle. One degree slice of projectile and forcing cone section of gun tube was modeled as simplified smooth bore 3D analysis model. The results were in agreement with the measured results in firing trials and also with the results presented in open literature. Although simplified computations were used, the influences of the structural modifications of the rotating band and the shell body were shown.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic views of rotating band type cross sections and designation of engraving shapes on band

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Figure 2

Geometry and boundary conditions of “smooth bore” 3D calculation model of one degree slice

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Figure 3

Detailed view of typical element mesh in calculation

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Figure 4

Stress–strain curves of materials

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Figure 5

Shot base pressure p1 versus time as a result of numerical simulation of internal ballistic cycle

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Figure 6

Comparison of projectile travel versus time between the internal ballistic curve and travel curves of finite element calculation cases

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Figure 7

Computed radial stress (Pa) after projectile travel of approximately 0.1 m. Minimum value of tube radial stress is approximately −750 MPa (local maximum compression on inner surface of tube wall).

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Figure 8

Computed accumulated equivalent plastic strain (m/m) after projectile travel of approximately 0.1 m

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Figure 9

The computed hoop strain of tube outside surface at distance of ∼51 mm from CofR for the calculation models. The rotating band passes the location at time of approximately 4.3 ms.

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Figure 10

The computed axial strain of tube outside surface at distance of ∼51 mm from CofR for the calculation models

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Figure 11

The computed comparison pressure pC (Eq. 1) for each model obtained using the computed strains at the distance of ∼51 mm from CofR

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Figure 12

Comparison of computed and measured hoop strain for the projectile ID1 at the measurement section F

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Figure 13

Comparison of computed and measured axial strain for the projectile ID1 at the measurement section F

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Figure 14

Comparison of computed and measured hoop strain for the projectile ID3 at the measurement section F

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Figure 15

Comparison of computed and measured axial strain for the projectile ID3 at the measurement section F

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Figure 16

Comparison of relative computed (finite element method) and measured peak values of comparison pressure near the CofR for five projectiles. High velocity charge.

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