0
Research Papers

Improved Finite Element Model to Predict the Reverse Loading Behavior of Autofrettaged A723 and HB7 Cylinders

[+] Author and Article Information
E. Troiano

US Army–Benét Labs, Watervliet, NY 12189–4050edward.j.troiano.civ@mail.mil

J. H. Underwood

Battelle Scientific Services, Watervliet, NY 12189–4050john.h.underwood.ctr@mail.mil

A. M. Venter

Nesca Ltd, Pretoria 0001, South Africaandrew.venter@necsa.co.za

J. H. Izzo

US Army–Benét Labs, Watervliet, NY 12189–4050john.h.izzo.civ@mail.mil

J. M. Norray

US Army–Benét Labs, Watervliet, NY 12189–4050john.m.norray.civ@mail.mil

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 134(4), 041012 (Jul 17, 2012) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006603 History: Received November 08, 2011; Revised April 02, 2012; Published July 17, 2012

Ideal isotropic or kinematic hardening is often utilized in order to simplify the modeling of the loading and reverse loading behavior of materials when using finite element analysis. Unfortunately, this simplification can result in significant error if the material exhibits the Bauschinger effect (BE), which is the loss of strength of the material upon reverse loading. The error associated with this simplification is further compounded in heavily autofrettaged, Cr-Mo-V, thick walled cylinders due to the fact that the Bauschinger effect and the reverse loading strain hardening exponent are a strong function of the initial applied plastic strains, which can vary significantly throughout the wall of the cylinder.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Applied loading and reverse loading stress versus strain and Original A723 YIELD SURFACE

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Hoop stress predictions (Hill—dotted line and FE—solid line) using the Original A723 YIELD SURFACE in Fig. 1 compared to neutron diffraction hoop stresses—triangles

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

New A723 YIELD SURFACE

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Applied loading and reverse loading stress versus strain showing HB7 YIELD SURFACE

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Methodology used in FE model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Measured and residual stresses in A723 steel, W = 2.25

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Measured and residual stresses in A723 steel, W = 1.95

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Measured and residual stresses in HB7 steel, W = 2.3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Measured and residual stresses in HB7 steel, W = 1.8

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In