0
NDE

Residual Stress Measurements in an Autofrettage Tube Using Hole Drilling Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Hamid Jahed1

Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering,  University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W., Waterloo, ON, N2L3G1, Canadahjahed@uwaterloo.ca

Mohammad Reza Faritus

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16684, Iranmr_faritus@yahoo.com

Zeinab Jahed

Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering,  University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W., Waterloo, ON, N2L3G1, Canadazjahedmo@uwaterloo.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 134(5), 051501 (Aug 27, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007072 History: Received November 03, 2011; Accepted April 08, 2012; Published August 27, 2012

Relieved strains due to drilling hole in a ring sample cut from an autofrettage cylinder are measured. Measured strains are then transformed to residual stresses using calibration constants and mathematical relations of elasticity based on ASTM standard recommendations (American Society for Testing and Materials, ASTM E 837-08, 2008, “Standard Test Method for Determining Residual Stresses by the Hole-Drilling Strain-Gage Method,” American Society for Testing and Materials). The hydraulic autofrettage is pressurizing a closed-end long cylinder beyond its elastic limits and subsequently removing the pressure. In contrast to three-dimensional stress state in the autofrettage tube, the stress measurement in hole drilling method is performed on a traction free surface formed from cutting the ring sample. The process of cutting the ring sample from a long autofrettaged tube is simulated using finite element method (FEM) and the redistribution of the residual stress due to the cut is discussed. Hence, transformation of the hole drilling measurements on the ring slice to the autofrettage residual stresses is revealed. The residual stresses are also predicted by variable material properties (VMP) method (Jahed, H., and Dubey, R. N., 1997, “An Axisymmetric Method of Elastic-Plastic Analysis Capable of Predicting Residual Stress Field,” Trans. ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 119 , pp. 264–273) using real loading and unloading behavior of the test material. Prediction results for residual hoop stress agree very well with the measurements. However, radial stress predictions are less than measured values particularly in the middle of the ring. To remove the discrepancy in radial residual stresses, the measured residual hoop stress that shows a self-balanced distribution was taken as the basis for calculating residual radial stresses using field equations of elasticity. The obtained residual stresses were improved a lot and were in good agreement with the VMP solution.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Test specimen; after measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Measured strains; readings of strain gauge 1 at different hole depths; R represents radii location; solid lines are polynomial fits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Measured strains; readings of strain gauge 2 at different hole depths; R represents radii location; solid lines are polynomial fits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Measured strains; readings of strain gauge 3 at different hole depths; R represents radii location; solid lines are polynomial fits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Strain distribution as measured at the final hole depth; solid lines are polynomial fits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Numerical values of calibration constants a and b recommended by ASTM E837-08 (Table 3 in Ref. [5]); Do represents the hole diameter

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Residual radial stress calculated from measured strains, solid lines are polynomial fits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Residual hoop stress calculated from measured strains, solid lines are polynomial fits

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Finite element model of the autofrettaged cylinder and the boundary conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Hoop residual stress contours (a) before and (b) after the cut.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Residual stress distribution due to autofrettage before and after cutting the test piece

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Changes in residual stress due to the cut that needs to be superimposed on the measurement results

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Comparison of plane stress residual stress to that of after the cut in a closed-end case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Loading and unloading behaviour of NiCrMoV125 [16] used for residual stress prediction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Modified measured residual radial stress

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Residual radial stress prediction using VMP method [13] and hole drilling measurement results

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Residual hoop stress prediction using VMP method [13] and hole drilling measurement results

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In