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Seismic Engineering

Sloshing Response of Floating Roofed Liquid Storage Tanks Subjected to Earthquakes of Different Types

[+] Author and Article Information
F. G. Golzar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,Faculty of Engineering,  Urmia University, Urmia 15311-57561, Iran

R. Shabani1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,Faculty of Engineering,  Urmia University, Urmia 15311-57561, Iranr.shabani@urmia.ac.ir

S. Tariverdilo

Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,  Urmia University, Urmia 15311-57561, Iran

G. Rezazadeh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,  Urmia University, Urmia 15311-57561, Iran

1

Corresponding author.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 134(5), 051801 (Sep 10, 2012) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006858 History: Received July 18, 2011; Revised April 22, 2012; Published September 10, 2012; Online September 10, 2012

Using extended Hamiltonian variational principle, the governing equations for sloshing response of floating roofed storage tanks are derived. The response of the floating roofed storage tanks is evaluated for different types of ground motions, including near-source and long-period far-field records. Besides comparing the response of the roofed and unroofed tanks, the effect of different ground motions on the wave elevation, lateral forces, and overturning moments induced on the tank is investigated. It is concluded that the dimensionless sloshing heights for the roofed tanks are solely a function of their first natural period. Also it is shown that while long-period far-field ground motions control the free board height, near-source records give higher values for lateral forces and overturning moments induced on the tank. This means that same design spectrum could not be used to evaluate the free board and lateral forces in the seismic design of storage tanks. Finally, two cases are studied to reveal the stress patterns caused by different earthquakes.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Cylindrical liquid storage tank with a double deck floating roof

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Figure 2

Sketch of radial and vertical pressure distributions on the tank wall

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Figure 3

Time histories of different ground motions: (a) Kobe, (b) Imperial Valley, (c) Tokachi-oki, (d) Tohoku

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Figure 4

Velocity response spectra of different ground motions: (a) Kobe, (b) Imperial Valley, (c) Tokachi-oki, (d)Tohoku

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Figure 5

Lowest two natural periods (T1, T2) of assumed models: (a) model A: H = 15, (b) model B: H = 20

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Figure 6

Response of model A to Kobe earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 7

Response of model B to Kobe earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 8

Response of model A to Imperial Valley earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 9

Response of model B to Imperial Valley earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 10

Response of model A to Tokachi-oki earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 11

Response of model B to Tokachi-oki earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 22

Frequency content of stress at roof (H = 20, R = 40): (a) Kobe excitation, (b) Tokachi-oki excitation

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Figure 21

Frequency content of stress at roof (H = 15, R = 25): (a) Kobe excitation, (b) Tokachi-oki excitation

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Figure 20

Roof stress patterns in a floating roofed tank (H = 20, R = 40): (a) maximum radial stress, (b) maximum circumferential stress

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Figure 19

Roof stress patterns in model A (H = 15, R = 25): (a) maximum radial stress, (b) maximum circumferential stress

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Figure 18

Comparison of responses of model B to different earthquakes: (a) sloshing height, (b) lateral force, (c) overturning moment

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Figure 17

Comparison of responses of model A to different earthquakes: (a) sloshing height, (b) lateral force, (c) overturning moment

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Figure 16

Dimensionless overturning moments induced by (a) Kobe, (b) Imperial Vally, (c) Tokachi-oki, (d) Tohoku earthquakes (U, unroofed; R, roofed)

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Figure 15

Dimensionless lateral forces induced by (a) Kobe, (b) Imperial Vally, (c) Tokachi-oki, (d) Tohoku earthquakes (U, unroofed; R, roofed)

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Figure 14

Dimensionless sloshing heightsinduced by (a) Kobe, (b) Imperial Vally, (c) Tokachi-oki, (d) Tohoku earthquakes (U, unroofed; R, roofed)

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Figure 13

Response of model B to Tohoku earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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Figure 12

Response of model A to Tohoku earthquake: (a) maximum sloshing height, (b) maximum lateral force, (c) maximum overturning moment

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