0
Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Weld Residual Stress in Various Large Diameter Nuclear Nozzles

[+] Author and Article Information
Tao Zhang

e-mail: tzhang@emc-sq.com

Gery Wilkowski

Engineering Mechanics
Corporation of Columbus,
3518 Riverside Drive - Suite 202,
Columbus, OH 43221

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 18, 2011; final manuscript received April 28, 2012; published online November 21, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Xian-Kui Zhu.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 134(6), 061214 (Nov 21, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007036 History: Received August 18, 2011; Revised April 28, 2012

Weld residual stresses in nuclear power plants can lead to cracking concerns caused by stress corrosion. Many factors can lead to the development of the weld residual stresses, and the distributions of the stress through the wall thickness can vary markedly depending on the weld processing parameters, nozzle and pipe geometries, among other factors. Hence, understanding the residual stress distribution is important in order to evaluate the reliability of pipe and nozzle welded joints. This paper represents an examination of the weld residual stress distributions which occur in different nozzles. The geometries considered here are large diameter thick wall pipe and nozzles. The detailed weld residual stress predictions for these nozzles are summarized. These results are categorized and organized in this paper and general trends for the causes of the distributions are established. The solutions are obtained using several different constitutive models including kinematic hardening, isotropic hardening, and mixed hardening model. Necessary fabrication procedures such as weld repair, overlay, and postweld heat treatment are also considered. The residual stress field can therefore be used to perform a crack growth and instability analysis. Some general discussions and comments are given in the paper.

Copyright © 2012 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Brust, F. W., Zhang, T., ShimD.-J., Wilkowski, G. M., and Rudland, D., 2011, “Modeling Crack Growth in Weld Residual Stress Fields Using the Finite Element Alternating Method,” Proceedings of the ASME 2011 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division Conference, Baltimore, MD, July 17–21, Paper PVP2011-57935.
Zhang, T., Brust, F., Wilkowski, G., Rudland, D., and Csontos, A., 2009, “Welding Residual Stress and Multiple Flaw Evaluation for Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Replacement Welds With Alloy 52,” 2009 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, July 26–30, 2009.
Wang, Y.-Y., Feng, Z., Cheng, W., and Liu, S., 1988, “Residual Stress Effects on Crack Driving Force in Multipass Welds,” Pressure Vessel and Piping (PVP) Conference, San Diego, CA, July 1998.
Tsai, C. L., Park, S. C., and Cheng, W., 1999, “Welding Distortion of a Thin-Plate Panel Structure,” Weld. J. (Miami, FL, U.S.), 78(5), pp. 156s–165s.
Feng, Z., Wang, X., Hubbard, C. R., and Spooner, S., 1996, “A FE Model for Residual Stresses in Repair Welds,” Residual Stresses in Design, Fabrication, Assessment and Repair, ASME PVP-Vol. 327, pp. 119–125.
Zhang, T., Wilkowski, G., Rudland, D., Brust, F., Mehta, H. S., and Sommerville, D. V., 2008, “Weld-Overlay Analyses—An Investigation of the Effect of Weld Sequencing,” 2008 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference, Chicago, IL, July 27–31, 2008.
Brust, F., Zhang, T., Shim, D.J., Kalyanam, S., Wilkowski, G., Smith, M., and Goodfellow, A., 2010, “Summary of Weld Residual Stress Analyses for Dissimilar Metal Weld Nozzles,” 2010 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division/K-PVP Conference, Bellevue, Washington, July 18–22, 2010.
Zhang, T., Brust, F., Wilkowski, G., Ranganath, S., Tsai, Y., Huang, C., and Liu, R.2010, “Weld Residual Stress Analysis and the Effects of Structural Overlay on Various Nuclear Power Plant Nozzles,” 2010 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division/K-PVP Conference, Bellevue, Washington, July 18–22, 2010.
Rudland, D., Zhang, T., Wilkowski, G., and Csontos, A., 2008, “Welding Residual Stress Solutions for Dissimilar Metal Surge Line Nozzles Welds,” 2008 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference, Chicago, IL, July 27–31, 2008.
Rudland, D., Chen, Y., Zhang, T., Wilkowski, G., Broussard, J., and White, G., 2007, “Comparison of Welding Residual Stress Solutions for Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles,” 2007 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference, San Antonio, TX, July 22–26, 2007.
Goldak, J., Chakravarti, A., and Bibby, M., 1984, “A New Finite Element Model for Welding Heat Sources,” Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 15B, pp. 299–305. [CrossRef]
abaqus 6.8-1 (6.10-1), Dassault Simulia, 2008–2010.
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Engineering, Component Integrity Branch: International Weld Residual Stress Round Robin Problem Statement Phase IV—Mockup, 2009.
Zhang, T., Shim, D-J., Kalyanam, S., Brust, F., Hattery, G., and Wilkowski, G., 2010, “Weld Residual Stress Analysis for Sizewell B Power Station Steam Generator and Pressuriser Safe End Welds,” Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus Report 09-C133-01-T2 Revision 4.
Withers, P., and Bhadeshia, H., 2001, “Residual Stress Part 1—Measurement Techniques,” Mater. Sci. Technol., 17(4), pp. 355–365. [CrossRef]
George, D., Kingston, E., and Smith, D., 2002, “Measurement of Through Thickness Stresses Using Small Holes,” J. Strain Anal., 372, pp. 125–139. [CrossRef]
Mahmoudi, A., Stefanescu, D., Hossain, S., Truman, C., and Smith, D., 2006, “Measurement and Prediction of Residual Stress Field Generated by Side-Punching,” J. Eng. Mater. Technol., 1283, pp. 451–459. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Axial stress development after repair, SS weld, and weld overlay

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Hoop stress development after repair, SS weld, and weld overlay

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Axial stress comparison for different hardening rules and measurements before weld overlay

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Hoop stress comparison for different hardening rules and measurements before weld overlay

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Hoop stress at room temperature comparison for different hardening rules

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Axial stress at room temperature comparison for different hardening rules

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Hoop stress contour plots (a) isotropic; (b) mix; (c) nonlinear kinematic hardening rules

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Axial stress contour plots (a) isotropic; (b) mix; (c) nonlinear kinematic hardening rules

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Finite element mesh (a) overall mesh; (b) magnified view

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

RPV nozzle with weld overlay repair dimensions (unit: inch)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Axial stress comparison for different hardening rules and measurements after weld overlay

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Hoop stress comparison for different hardening rules and measurements after weld overlay

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Weld axial residual stresses in steam generator–hot leg nozzle DMW at room temperature with no service stresses applied (using nonlinear-kinematic hardening)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Weld hoop residual stresses in steam generator–hot leg nozzle DMW (using nonlinear-kinematic hardening) at room temperature with no service stresses applied

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Operation weld residual stresses for steam generator–hot leg nozzle at 325 °C. (Comparison of nonlinear-kinematic hardening and isotropic hardening)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Key dimensions of steam generator (unit: millimeter)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Developed steam generator finite element mesh

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 23

Overall finite element of the model (a) and weld passes (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 24

Postweld heat treatment history

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 25

Axial stress comparison (a) before PWHT and (b) after PWHT

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 26

Hoop stresses comparison (a) before PWHT and (b) after PWHT

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 27

Path definition for line plots

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 28

Axial (a) and Hoop (b) stress comparison through weld center

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 22

Metallographic section of the weld (a) and weld beads (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Axial stress plots along weld center for SG nozzle (nonlinear kinematic hardening case)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Hoop stress plots along weld center for SG nozzle (nonlinear kinematic hardening case)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Axial stress plots along weld center for SG nozzle (isotropic hardening case)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Hoop stress plots along weld center for SG nozzle (isotropic hardening case)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In