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Research Papers: NDE

Eddy Current Nondestructive Testing for Carbon Fiber- Reinforced Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Hiroshi Hoshikawa

College of Industrial Technology,
Nihon University,
1-2-1 Izumicho Narashino,
Chiba 275-8575, Japan

Gouki Kojima

Graduate School of Nihon University,
1-2-1 Izumicho Narashino,
Chiba 275-8575, Japan

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology. Manuscript received May 10, 2011; final manuscript received September 18, 2011; published online June 11, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Marina Ruggles-Wrenn.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 135(4), 041501 (Jun 11, 2013) (5 pages) Paper No: PVT-11-1117; doi: 10.1115/1.4023253 History: Received May 10, 2011; Revised September 18, 2011

This paper describes the use of an eddy current testing (ECT) method for the inspection and detection of impact damage in carbon fiber-reinforced composites (CFRP). ECT method is a nondestructive testing (NDT) method where electric induction is used. This method is widely used for detecting cracks and corrosion in metals, or checking their electric conductivity. Because carbon fiber in CFRP has electric conductivity, ECT method has a potential to inspect the defects. However, electric conductivity of CFRP is much smaller than that of metals. Moreover, from the view of the eddy current probe, CFRP to be checked looks as a inhomogeneous conductive materials where conductive fibers are bundled and laid up, and this is completely different situation comparing with metal samples that are homogeneous. Therefore, there are several problems to be solved for applying ECT method to CFRP such as proper selection of test frequency, shape of probe, or signal processing.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Structure of eddy current theta probe, consisting of a exciting pancake coil and a detecting tangential coil

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Fig. 2

Structure of CP probe used for eddy current testing

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Fig. 3

Flow of eddy current without defects.

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Fig. 4

Principles of defect detection in CFRP using CP probe. (a) Flow of eddy current when a CP probe is positioned at the edge of a defect. (b) Flow of eddy current when a CP probe is positioned at the middle of a defect.

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Fig. 5

Normalized impedance of the CP probe's exciting coil for each sample. In the figure, R0 is resistance of exciting coil in the air, L0 is reactance in the air.

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Fig. 6

Eddy current distribution by circle exciting coil. (a) Cloth CFRP (b) Unidirectional CFRP in the case of 0 deg sheet (c) Unidirectional CFRP in the case of 90 deg sheet.

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Fig. 7

Detection results for cloth CFRP. (a) Without defect (b) with defect.

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Fig. 8

Detection results for unidirectional CFRP using a theta probe. (a) Without defect (b) with defect.

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Fig. 9

Detection results for unidirectional CFRP using a CP probe. (a) Without defect (b) with defect.

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Fig. 10

Detection results for quasi-isotropic CFRP using theta probe. (a) Without defect (b) with defect.

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Fig. 11

Detection results for quasi-isotropic CFRP using CP probe

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