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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at High Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
Celine Cabet

CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME
Laboratoire d'Etude de la
Corrosion Non Aqueuse,
Bat 458, PC 50 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette,
Paris 91191, France
e-mail: celine.cabet@cea.fr

Laura Carroll

e-mail: Laura.Carroll@INL.gov

Richard Wright

e-mail: Richard.Wright@INL.gov
Idaho National Laboratory,
1955 Fremont, PO Box 1625,
Idaho Falls, ID 83415

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received December 17, 2010; final manuscript received April 11, 2013; published online October 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Douglas Scarth.

This manuscript has been authored or co-authored by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 135(6), 061401 (Oct 07, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: PVT-10-1181; doi: 10.1115/1.4025080 History: Received December 17, 2010; Revised April 11, 2013

Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) application of the very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 °C. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior. Initial creep-fatigue work on Alloy 617 suggests a more dominant role of environment with increasing temperature and/or hold times evidenced through changes in creep-fatigue crack growth mechanisms and failure life. Continuous cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of Alloy 617 was conducted at 950 °C and 0.3% and 0.6% total strain in air to simulate damage modes expected in a VHTR application. Continuous cycle fatigue specimens exhibited transgranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was observed in the creep-fatigue specimens and the addition of a hold time at peak tensile strain degraded the cycle life. This suggests that creep-fatigue interaction occurs and that the environment may be partially responsible for accelerating failure.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Microstructure of the as-annealed (a) and aged (b) Alloy 617 (aging for 200 H at 950 °C)

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Fig. 2

Peak tensile and compressive stress plotted as a function of cycle for fatigue and creep-fatigue tests at 950 °C and a 0.3% total strain range (a). Hysteresis loops for the no-hold (b) and 600 s-hold (c) creep-fatigue test shown for selected cycles.

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Fig. 3

Peak tensile and compressive stress plotted as a function of cycle for fatigue and creep-fatigue tests at 950 °C and a 0.6% total strain range (a). Hysteresis loops for the no-hold fatigue (b) and 600-s hold creep-fatigue (c) test are shown for selected cycles.

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Fig. 4

Cycles to failure as a function of hold time for creep-fatigue testing at 950 °C

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Fig. 5

Stress relaxation curves for creep-fatigue tests at 950 °C and 0.3% (a) and 0.6% (b) total strain range

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Fig. 6

Specimen tested at a total strain range of 0.3% in low cycle fatigue (a) and creep-fatigue with a 600-s hold (b). The stress axis is from top to bottom in the plane of the page.

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Fig. 7

Optical images of specimens tested at 0.3% total strain in low cycle fatigue (a) and at 0.3% total strain in creep-fatigue with a 600 s hold (b) and at 0.6% total strain in creep-fatigue with an 1800-s hold (c). The image in (c) is at a depth of ∼1000 μm below the specimen surface. The stress axis is from top to bottom in the plane of the page.

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Fig. 8

SEM images of a specimen tested at a total strain range of 0.3% in creep-fatigue with an 1800-s hold. The image in (b) shows the main crack tip. The stress axis is from left to right in the plane of the page.

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