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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Calculation of Dynamic Stress Intensity Factors for Pipes During Crack Propagation by Dynamic Finite Element Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Masaki Mitsuya

Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
Suehiro, Tsurumi,
Yokohama 230-0045, Japan
e-mail: mitsuya@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Hiroyuki Motohashi

e-mail: motohasi@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Noritake Oguchi

e-mail: yuri_o@tokyo-gas.co.jp
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
Kaigan, Minato,
Tokyo 105-8527, Japan

Shuji Aihara

The University of Tokyo,
Department of Systems Innovation,
Hongo, Bunkyo,
Tokyo 230-0045, Japan
e-mail: aihara@fract.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 25, 2013; final manuscript received September 23, 2013; published online November 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: David L. Rudland.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(1), 011207 (Nov 07, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1072; doi: 10.1115/1.4025617 History: Received April 25, 2013; Revised September 23, 2013

A dynamic finite element analysis method was proposed for calculating the dynamic stress intensity factors for pipes during crack propagation. The proposed method can directly calculate the stress intensity factors without the simplification used in theoretical analyses, and it can consider the effects of the crack velocity and gas decompression. It was found that the stress intensity factors of long propagating cracks in pipes saturated at a certain value in the case of a high crack velocity. However, the stress intensity factors for pipes were in good agreement with those of band plates in the case of a high crack velocity, the stress intensity factors for pipes were different from those of band plates in the case of a low crack velocity. This result could be explained by the effect of bulging on the stress distribution around a crack tip. The effect of bulging was more prominent for pipes with smaller diameters. In contrast, the dynamic stress intensity factors for band plates were in good agreement with the theoretical values that consider the dynamic effects and tended to decrease monotonically with increasing crack velocity. Additionally, the effects of gas decompression, caused by leakage from opened cracks, on the stress intensity factors for pipes were investigated. An explanation of the change in crack direction, reflecting a change from an axial crack to a circumferential crack, which is observed in actual pipeline fractures, was given by analyzing the ratio of the longitudinal stress to lateral stress.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Boundary conditions

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Fig. 4

Stress distributions around crack tip (pipe, Dm = 849.3 mm, crack length a = 1.6 m)

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Fig. 5

Deformed shape and stress distribution perpendicular to the crack propagation (crack length a = 1.6 m, with mirror image)

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Fig. 6

Histories of Stress intensity factor for band plates (2 h/π = 849.3 mm)

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Fig. 7

Effects of crack velocity on stress intensity factor for band plate

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Fig. 8

Histories of stress intensity factor for pipes (Dm = 849.3 mm)

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Fig. 9

Effects of crack velocity on stress intensity factor for pipes with different diameter

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Fig. 10

Effects of gas decompression on stress intensity factor (Dm = 849.3 mm, p0 = 2.0 MPa)

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Fig. 11

Distribution of internal pressure (Dm = 849.3 mm, p0 = 2.0 MPa)

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Fig. 12

Crack paths observed by Radon et al. [19] in experiments on biaxially stressed PMMA sheets

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Fig. 13

Boundary conditions in FEA on biaxially stressed PMMA sheets

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Fig. 14

Relationship between local biaxiality ratio and nominal biaxiality for the PMMA sheet

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Fig. 15

Ratio of local stress (at r = 3 mm)

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