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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Interfacial Flaw Evolution of Coatings Under Severe Thermal and Pressure Transients

[+] Author and Article Information
J. T. Harris

Engineering Science and Mechanics,
The Pennsylvania State University,
212 EES Building,
University Park, PA 16803
e-mail: jth203@psu.edu

A. E. Segall

Engineering Science and Mechanics,
The Pennsylvania State University,
212 EES Building,
University Park, PA 16803
e-mail: aesegall@psu.edu

D. Robinson

Engineering Science and Mechanics,
The Pennsylvania State University,
212 EES Building,
University Park, PA 16803

R. Carter

U.S. Army Research Laboratory,
AMSRL-WM-MB,
Building 4600, C138,
Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066
e-mail: rcarter@arl.army.mil

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 21, 2013; final manuscript received October 9, 2013; published online September 4, 2014. Assoc. Editor: David L. Rudland.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(6), 061205 (Sep 04, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1085; doi: 10.1115/1.4025721 History: Received May 21, 2013; Revised October 09, 2013

The effects of severe thermal and pressure transients on coated substrates with indentation-induced, blister defects were analyzed by experimental and finite element methods. Cohesive zone properties evaluated in a previous study were first used in an implicit indentation simulation. Indentation simulation results then served as the initial conditions for explicit modeling of interfacial flaw evolution due to the already determined thermal and pressure transients that included interstitial pressure in the defect. The thermal structural model was used to assess the transient thermal- and stress-states and the propensity for fracture related damage and evolution while undergoing severe convective heating and pressure loading analogous to gun tube conditions. Results illustrated the overall benefits of the in-phase applied pressure in terms of suppressing crack growth except when delayed interstitial loading was considered. Thermal capacitance was also studied and it was found that crack growth decreased significantly with higher specific heat and demonstrates the potential importance of coating thermophysical properties.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Shear and normal contact separation curve for (a) Mode I and (b) Modes II and III loading

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Fig. 2

Close up of meshed, geometry for indentation simulation and thermal mechanical precracked model. The conditions after indentation, including the initial flaw were applied as initial conditions for the thermal structural simulation.

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Fig. 3

Gap conductance as a function of gap clearance

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Fig. 4

Crack tip radius as a function of radial position for simulations with thermal transient, and thermal, and pressure transients

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Fig. 5

Crack radius as a function of radial position for simulations with varying coating specific heat values

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Fig. 6

Interfacial damage accumulated during stages of the transient in simulations with specific heat of (a) 440 and (b) 600 kJ/kg K

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Fig. 7

Close-up of the crack tip showing interfacial damage accumulated during stages of the thermal transient in simulations with specific heat of (a) 440 and (b) 600 kJ/kg K

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Fig. 8

Comparison of state of final damage between simulations with varying coating specific heat values, with the crack tip conditions inlayed

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