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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Investigation of Residual Stress Development During Swage Autofrettage, Using Finite Element Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael C. Gibson

Department of Informatics
and Systems Engineering,
Cranfield University,
Defence Academy College of Management
and Technology,
Swindon SN6 8LA, UK
e-mail: m.c.gibson@cranfield.ac.uk

Amer Hameed

Department of Engineering and Applied Science,
Cranfield University,
Defence Academy College of Management
and Technology,
Swindon SN6 8LA, UK
e-mail: a.hameed@cranfield.ac.uk

John G. Hetherington

Department of Engineering and Applied Science,
Cranfield University,
Defence Academy College of Management
and Technology,
Swindon SN6 8LA, UK
e-mail: j.g.hetherington@cranfield.ac.uk

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 5, 2013; final manuscript received October 28, 2013; published online January 30, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Pierre Mertiny.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(2), 021206 (Jan 30, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1044; doi: 10.1115/1.4025968 History: Received March 05, 2013; Revised October 28, 2013

Swaging is one method of autofrettage, a means of prestressing high-pressure vessels to increase their fatigue lives and load bearing capacity. Swaging achieves the required deformation through physical interference between an oversized mandrel and the bore diameter of the tube, as it is pushed through the tube. A finite element model of the swaging process was developed, in ansys, and systematically refined, to investigate the mechanism of deformation and subsequent development of residual stresses. A parametric study was undertaken, of various properties such as mandrel slope angle, parallel section length, and friction coefficient. It is observed that the axial stress plays a crucial role in the determination of the residual hoop stress and reverse yielding. The model, and results obtained from it, provides a means of understanding the swaging process and how it responds to different parameters. This understanding, coupled with future improvements to the model, potentially allows the swaging process to be refined, in terms of residual stresses development and mandrel driving force.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Bilinear kinematic material model

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Fig. 4

Mesh sizing diagram

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Fig. 5

Relative error of residual hoop stresses at mid-length on the ID

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Fig. 6

Residual hoop stresses at mid-length resulting from swage autofrettage, as mesh fineness varies, compared with O'Hara's results, ElAx−ll ≥ 4

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Fig. 7

Residual hoop stresses at mid-length resulting from swage autofrettage, as tube section length varies

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Fig. 8

Residual axial stresses at mid-length resulting from swage autofrettage, as time steps vary

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Fig. 9

Overstrain depth, at mid-length, as parallel section length, lll, varies

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Fig. 10

Autofrettage radial stresses, at mid-length, as parallel section length, lll, varies

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Fig. 11

Residual hoop stresses, at mid-length, as parallel section length, lll, varies

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Fig. 12

Residual axial stresses, at mid-length, as parallel section length, lll, varies

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Fig. 13

Autofrettage shear stresses, at mid-length, as coefficient of friction varies

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Fig. 14

Residual hoop stresses, at mid-length, as coefficient of friction varies

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Fig. 15

Residual axial stresses, at mid-length, as coefficient of friction varies

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Fig. 16

Autofrettage shear stresses, at mid-length, as slope scaling factor varies

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Fig. 17

Residual hoop stresses at mid-length, as slope scaling factor varies

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Fig. 18

Residual axial stresses at mid-length, as slope scaling factor varies

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