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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Microstructural Modeling of P91 Martensitic Steel Under Uniaxial Loading Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
B. J. Golden

Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical
and Biomedical Engineering,
Materials and Surface Science Institute,
University of Limerick,
Limerick, Ireland
e-mail: Brian.Golden@ul.ie

D. F. Li

Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical
and Biomedical Engineering,
Materials and Surface Science Institute,
University of Limerick,
Limerick, Ireland
e-mail: Dongfeng.Li@ul.ie

N. P. O'Dowd

Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical
and Biomedical Engineering,
Materials and Surface Science Institute,
University of Limerick,
Limerick, Ireland
e-mail: Noel.ODowd@ul.ie

P. Tiernan

Department of Design and
Manufacturing Technology,
Materials and Surface Science Institute,
University of Limerick,
Limerick, Ireland
e-mail: Peter.Tiernan@ul.ie

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 2, 2013; final manuscript received November 5, 2013; published online January 8, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Marina Ruggles-Wrenn.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(2), 021404 (Jan 08, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1105; doi: 10.1115/1.4026028 History: Received July 02, 2013; Revised November 05, 2013

The changing face of power generation and the increasingly severe conditions experienced by power plant materials require an improved understanding of the deformation and failure response of power plant materials. Important insights can be obtained through computational studies, where the material microstructure is explicitly modeled. In such models, the physical mechanisms of deformation and damage can be represented at the microscale, providing a more accurate prediction of material performance. In this paper, two approaches are examined to represent the microstructure of a martensitic power plant steel (P91). In one approach, the model is based on a “measured microstructure” with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) employed to obtain the orientation of the martensitic grain structure of the steel. The alternative approach is to use a “numerically simulated” model where the microstructure is generated using the Voronoi tessellation method. In both cases, the microstructural model is incorporated within a representative volume element (RVE) in a finite-element analysis. The material constitutive response is represented by a nonlinear, rate dependent, finite strain crystal plasticity model, with the microstructural orientation specified at each finite-element integration point by the microstructural model. The predictions from the two approaches are compared. The stress distributions are observed to be very similar, though some differences are seen in the strain variation within the RVE.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

SEM image of service aged P91 and (a) a packet within the steels microstructure

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Fig. 2

Generated microstructure model with grains obtained using Voronoi tessellation

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Fig. 3

Euler angle information obtained from electron backscatter diffraction

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Fig. 4

Global stress versus strain graph of the two RVE models under 10% uniaxial loading

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Fig. 5

Normal stress distribution in the MM model at 10% uniaxial loading

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Fig. 6

Normal stress distribution in the GM model at 10% uniaxial loading

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Fig. 7

Histogram of the stress distribution in the MM model at 10% strain

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Fig. 8

Histogram of the stress distribution in the GM model at 10% strain

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Fig. 9

Accumulated equivalent plastic strain distribution in MM model at 10% uniaxial loading

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Fig. 10

Accumulated equivalent plastic strain distribution in GM model at 10% uniaxial loading

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Fig. 11

Histogram of the accumulated equivalent plastic strain in the MM model at 10% strain

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Fig. 12

Histogram of the accumulated equivalent plastic strain in the GM model at 10% strain

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Fig. 13

Macroscopic experimental stress–strain data fitted with constitutive law

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Fig. 14

A cumulative distribution function showing the FEA results compared with model fit at 10% macroscopic strain

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