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Research Papers: Pipeline Systems

Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Seismic Ground Response Analysis of Local Site Effects for Estimating Seismic Behavior of Buried Pipelines

[+] Author and Article Information
Tsuyoshi Ichimura

Associate Professor
Earthquake Research Institute,
The University of Tokyo,
1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 1130032, Japan
e-mail: ichimura@eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Kohei Fujita

Research Fellow of the Japan Society
for the Promotion of Science (DC),
Department of Civil Engineering,
The University of Tokyo,
1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 1130032, Japan
e-mail: fujita@eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Muneo Hori

Professor
Earthquake Research Institute,
The University of Tokyo,
1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 1130032, Japan
e-mail: hori@eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Takashi Sakanoue

Researcher
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
1-7-7 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku,
Yokohama 2300045, Japan
e-mail: sakanoue@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Ryo Hamanaka

Researcher
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
1-5-20 Kaigan, Minato-ku,
Tokyo 1058527, Japan
e-mail: ryo-hamanaka@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 4, 2013; final manuscript received November 28, 2013; published online April 3, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Chong-Shien Tsai.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(4), 041702 (Apr 03, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1131; doi: 10.1115/1.4026208 History: Received August 04, 2013; Revised November 28, 2013

Damage to buried pipelines caused by local amplification of seismic ground motion in highly nonuniform grounds is not yet fully understood. The development of methods to evaluate the amplification of ground motion in complex ground structures is thus desirable. Here, we report large-scale nonlinear seismic ground response analysis using a 3D nonlinear finite element method (FEM) and attempt to reproduce observed seismic ground motion. We also discuss the strain amplification processes and their effects on buried pipelines in detail. The findings are expected to aid in improving the seismic resistance of buried pipelines.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Input waveform used to excite the model at the bottom of bedrock

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Fig. 2

3D ground structure model, and the position of observation points P1 and P2, and lines A, B, and C. (b) Close-up view of the region shown by the rectangle in (a).

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the measured and simulated waveforms at P1

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Fig. 4

Comparison of the measured and simulated waveforms at P2

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Fig. 5

Distribution history of the norm of displacement. The white lines indicate lines A, B, C, and the boundary between the bedrock and layer 1.

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Fig. 6

Distribution history of the maximum principal strain. The white lines indicate lines A, B, C, and the boundary between the bedrock and layer 1.

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Fig. 7

Distribution history of the maximum norm of displacement and the maximum principal strain. The white lines indicate lines A, B, C, and the boundary between the bedrock and layer 1.

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Fig. 8

Geometric properties of layer 1. The white lines indicate lines A, B, C, and the boundary between the bedrock and layer 1.

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Fig. 9

Maximum axial displacement, maximum axial strain, and the underground structure of lines a, b, and c

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