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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Behavior of Compressive Residual Stresses in High Strength Steel Welds Induced by High Frequency Mechanical Impact Treatment

[+] Author and Article Information
Mansoor Khurshid

Department of Aeronautical
and Vehicle Engineering,
Division of Lightweight Structures,
KTH—Royal Institute of Technology,
Teknikringen 8,
Stockholm 100 44, Sweden
e-mail: khurshid@kth.se

Zuheir Barsoum

Department of Aeronautical
and Vehicle Engineering,
Division of Lightweight Structures,
KTH—Royal Institute of Technology,
Teknikringen 8,
Stockholm 100 44, Sweden
Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Khalifa University of Science,
Technology and Research (KUSTAR),
P.O. Box: 127788,
Abu Dhabi, UAE
e-mail: zuheir.barsoum@kustar.ac.ae;
zuheir@kth.se

Gary Marquis

Department of Applied Mechanics,
Aalto University,
P.O. Box 14300
Aalto 00076, Finland
e-mail: gary.marquis@aalto.fi

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 23, 2013; final manuscript received February 3, 2014; published online April 3, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Wolf Reinhardt.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(4), 041404 (Apr 03, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1117; doi: 10.1115/1.4026651 History: Received July 23, 2013; Revised February 03, 2014

Residual stress state plays an important role in the fatigue life of welded structures. The effect can be beneficial or detrimental, depending on the nature of residual stresses. High frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment is a postweld fatigue improvement technique for welded joints. In this research work the behavior of compressive residual stresses induced in welded joints in high strength steels (HSS) by HFMI treatment has been investigated. Longitudinal nonload carrying attachments in HSS are tested with constant amplitude (CA) and variable amplitude (VA) fatigue loading. Stress concentration factors have been calculated using finite element analysis (FEA). Residual stresses have been measured at different cycles during fatigue testing using X-ray diffraction technique. It is observed that the induced residual stresses are quite stable with some relaxation in CA and VA loading. The overloads in VA loading seem to be more detrimental. Relaxation of residual stresses is more obvious in VA tests.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Indenter sizes and configurations [3]

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Fig. 2

Specimen geometry (dimensions in mm)

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Fig. 3

Stress strain curves S700MC

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Fig. 4

(a) FWHM and (b) residual stresses

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Fig. 5

(a) Load block and (b) example spectrum

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Fig. 6

Specimen distribution of measuring residual stresses

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Fig. 7

(a) Residual stress measurement direction and (b) residual stress measurement points

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Fig. 8

Specimen 1 residual stress measurement, CA fatigue testing (stresses in (MPa) and distance in (mm))

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Fig. 9

Specimen 2 residual stress measurement, CA fatigue testing (stresses in (MPa) and distance in (mm))

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Fig. 10

Specimen 3 residual stress measurement, VA fatigue testing (stresses in (MPa) and distance in (mm))

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Fig. 11

Specimen 4 residual stress measurement, VA fatigue testing (stresses in (MPa) and distance in (mm))

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Fig. 12

(a) Face A side 1, residual stress behavior (stresses in (MPa) and cycles are (kilo cycles)), (b) face A side 2, residual stress behavior (stresses in (MPa) and cycles are (kilo cycles)), (c) face B side 1, residual stress behavior (stresses in (MPa) and cycles are (kilo cycles)), and (d) face B side 2, residual stress behavior (stresses in (MPa) and cycles are (kilo cycles))

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Fig. 13

(a) Specimen 1, gusset failure, (b) specimen 2, weld toe failure, (c) specimen 3, weld toe failure, and (d) specimen 4, weld toe failure

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