0
Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Investigation of Diametral Acoustic Modes in a Model of a Steam Control Gate Valve

[+] Author and Article Information
Oleksandr Barannyk

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Institute for Integrated Energy Systems,
University of Victoria,
P.O. Box 1700, Stn. CSC,
Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
e-mail: barannyk@me.uvic.ca

Peter Oshkai

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Institute for Integrated Energy Systems,
University of Victoria,
P.O. Box 1700, Stn. CSC,
Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada
e-mail: poshkai@me.uvic.ca

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 5, 2013; final manuscript received March 14, 2014; published online September 4, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Jong Chull Jo.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 136(6), 061302 (Sep 04, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1095; doi: 10.1115/1.4027228 History: Received June 05, 2013; Revised March 14, 2014

The objective of the present study is to provide an insight into mechanism of coupling between turbulent pipe flow and partially trapped diametral acoustic modes associated with a shallow cavity formed by the seat of a steam control gate valve. First, the effects of the internal pipe geometry immediately upstream and downstream of the shallow cavity on the characteristics of partially trapped diametral acoustic modes were investigated. The mode shapes were calculated numerically by solving a Helmholtz equation in a three-dimensional domain corresponding to the internal geometry of the pipe and the cavity. Second, the set of experiments were performed using a scaled model of a gate valve mounted in a pipeline that contained converging–diverging sections in the vicinity of the valve. Acoustic pressure measurements at three azimuthal locations at the floor of the cavity were performed for a range of geometries of the converging–diverging section and inflow velocities. The experimentally obtained pressure data were then used to scale the amplitude of the pressure in the numerical simulations. The present results are in good agreement with the results reported in earlier studies for an axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe with a uniform cross-section. The resonant response of the system corresponded to the second diametral mode of the cavity. Excitation of the dominant acoustic mode was accompanied by pressure oscillations corresponding to other acoustic modes. As the angle of the converging–diverging section of the main pipeline in the vicinity of the cavity increased, the trapped behavior of the acoustic diametral modes diminished, and additional antinodes of the acoustic pressure wave were observed in the main pipeline.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Janzen, V. P., Smith, B. A. W., Luloff, B. V., Pozsgai, J., Dietrich, A. R., Bouvier, J. M., and Errett, A. J., 2008, “Acoustic Noise Reduction in Large-Diameter Steam-Line Gate Valves,” Proceedings of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference 2007, Vol 4: Fluid-Structure Interaction, San Antonio, Texas, pp. 513–522.
Smith, B. A. W., and Luloff, B. V., 2000, “The Effect of Seat Geometry on Gate Valve Noise,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 122(4), pp. 401–407. [CrossRef]
Fomin, V., Kostarev, V., and Reinsch, K., 2001, “Elimination of Chernobyl NPP Unit 3 Power Output Limitation Associated With High Main Steam Piping Flow Induced Vibration,” Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology, Washington, DC, pp. 1375–1383.
Rockwell, D., and Naudascher, E., 1978, “Review: Self-Sustaining Oscillations of Flow Past Cavities,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 100(2), pp. 152–165. [CrossRef]
Ziada, S., and Buhlmann, E. T., 1992, “Self-Excited Resonances of 2 Side-Branches in Close Proximity,” J. Fluids Struct., 6(5), pp. 583–601. [CrossRef]
Bruggeman, J. C., Hirschberg, A., van Dongen, M. E. H., Wijnands, A. P. J., and Gorter, J., 1989, “Flow Induced Pulsations in Gas Transport Systems: Analysis of the Influence of Closed Side Branches,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 111(4), pp. 484–491. [CrossRef]
Kriesels, P. C., Peters, M. C., Hirschberg, A., Wijnands, A. P. J., Iafrati, A., Riccardi, G., Piva, R., and Bruggeman, J. C., 1995, “High Amplitude Vortex-Induced Pulsations in a Gas Transport System,” J. Sound Vib., 184(2), pp. 343–368. [CrossRef]
Tonon, D., Hirschberg, A., Golliard, J., and Ziada, S., 2011, “Aeroacoustics of Pipe Systems With Closed Branches,” Int. J. Aeroacoust., 10(2–3), pp. 201–275. [CrossRef]
Ziada, S., and Lafon, P., 2013, “Flow-Excited Acoustic Resonance Excitation Mechanism, Design Guidelines and Counter Measures,” ASME Appl. Mech. Rev., 66(1), pp. 1–21. [CrossRef]
Erdem, D., Rockwell, D., Oshkai, P., and Pollack, M., 2003, “Flow Tones in a Pipeline-Cavity System: Effect of Pipe Asymmetry,” J. Fluids Struct., 17(4), pp. 511–523. [CrossRef]
Michaud, S., Ziada, S., and Pastorel, H., 2001, “Acoustic Fatigue of a Steam Dump Pipe System Excited by Valve Noise,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 123(4), pp. 461–468. [CrossRef]
Rockwell, D., Lin, J. C., Oshkai, P., Reiss, M., and Pollack, M., 2003, “Shallow Cavity Flow Tone Experiments: Onset of Locked-On States,” J. Fluids Struct., 17(3), pp. 381–414. [CrossRef]
Verdugo, F. R., Guitton, A., and Camussi, R., 2012, “Experimental Investigation of a Cylindrical Cavity in a Low Mach Number Flow,” J. Fluids Struct., 28, pp. 1–19. [CrossRef]
Ziada, S., 2010, “Flow-Excited Acoustic Resonance in Industry,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 132(1), pp. 1–9. [CrossRef]
Blevins, R. D., 1990, Flow-Induced Vibration, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York.
Rockwell, D., and Knisely, C., 1979, “The Organized Nature of Flow Impingement Upon a Corner,” J. Fluid Mech., 93(3), pp. 413–432. [CrossRef]
Willmarth, W. W., Gasparovic, R. F., Maszatics, J. M., Mcnaughton, J. L., and Thomas, D. J., 1978, “Management of Turbulent Shear Layers in Separated Flow,” J. Aircraft, 15(7), pp. 385–386. [CrossRef]
Aly, K., and Ziada, S., 2010, “Flow-Excited Resonance of Trapped Modes of Ducted Shallow Cavities,” J. Fluids Struct., 26(1), pp. 92–120. [CrossRef]
Aly, K., and Ziada, S., 2011, “Azimuthal Behaviour of Flow-Excited Diametral Modes of Internal Shallow Cavities,” J. Sound Vib., 330(15), pp. 3666–3683. [CrossRef]
Duan, Y. T., Koch, W., Linton, C. M., and Mciver, M., 2007, “Complex Resonances and Trapped Modes in Ducted Domains,” J. Fluid Mech., 571, pp. 119–147. [CrossRef]
Evans, D. V., Linton, C. M., and Ursell, F., 1993, “Trapped Mode Frequencies Embedded in the Continuous-Spectrum,” Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math., 46, pp. 253–274. [CrossRef]
Linton, C. M., and Mciver, M., 1998, “Trapped Modes in Cylindrical Waveguides,” Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math., 51, pp. 389–412. [CrossRef]
Linton, C. M., Mciver, M., Mciver, P., Ratcliffe, K., and Zhang, J., 2002, “Trapped Modes for Off-Centre Structures in Guides,” Wave Motion, 36(1), pp. 67–85. [CrossRef]
Linton, C. M., and Mciver, M., 1998, “Trapped Modes in Cylindrical Waveguides,” Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math., 51(1), pp. 389–412. [CrossRef]
Peters, M. C., 1993, “Aeroacoustic Sources in Internal Flows,” Ph.D. thesis, Technical University of Eindhoven, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
Gijrath, J. W. M., Verhaar, B. T., and Bruggeman, J. C., 2000, “Prediction Model for Broadband Noise in Bends,” Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Flow Induced Vibration, Lucerne, Switzerland, pp. 623–627.
Geveci, M., Oshkai, P., Rockwell, D., Lin, J. C., and Pollack, M., 2003, “Imaging of the Self-Excited Oscillation of Flow Past a Cavity During Generation of a Flow Tone,” J. Fluids Struct., 18(6), pp. 665–694. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of the experimental system (dimensions in mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Characteristic parameters of the valve geometry

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) Computational domain and (b) computational grid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Frequency of the first diametral acoustic mode f1 as a function of the number of mesh elements N

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Pressure distributions corresponding to the case of α = 0 deg: (a) first diametral mode (f1 = 4141 Hz); (b) second diametral mode (f2 = 6665 Hz); (c) third diametral mode (f3 = 8973 Hz)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Pressure spectrum corresponding to the inflow velocity U = 21.5 m/s, for the case of α = 5 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Waterfall plot of the pressure amplitude as a function of the frequency f and the inflow velocity U for the case of α = 5 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Waterfall plot of the pressure amplitude as a function of the frequency f and the inflow velocity U for the case of α = 8 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Waterfall plot of the pressure amplitude as a function of the frequency f and the inflow velocity U for the case of α = 11.2 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Frequency as a function of the inflow velocity and the azimuthal position for the case of α = 5 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Pressure as a function of the inflow velocity and the azimuthal position for the case of α = 5 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Mode shape of the second acoustic diametral mode in the case of (a) α = 0 deg, (b) α = 5 deg, (c) α = 8 deg, and (d) α = 11.2 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Relative magnitude of the secondary pressure peak as a function of the convergence–divergence angle of the main pipeline in the vicinity of the cavity for the first three diametral modes

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In